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Chapter 27 : Prebiotics and Synbiotics in Companion Animal Science

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Abstract:

There is now considerable evidence to suggest that the colonic microbiota is susceptible to manipulation through diet. Certain foods, recognized as colonic functional foods, confer additional health benefits by improving the composition and activities of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Dietary components used for this purpose include probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics. Infections of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have an impact on the entire organism and are a major health problem that accounts for a large percentage of veterinary admissions. Vickers et al. used an in vitro fermentation system to test prebiotic fermentability. In this study, yeast cell wall (YCW) containing mannanoligosaccharides (MOS), short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS), and four inulin sources were compared to beet pulp, cellulose, and soy fiber, which are common fiber sources used in pet diets. Primary outcomes included bacterial growth as measured by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) production after 10 and 24 h of fermentation. The probes used in this study were Bif164, Bac303, Lab158, His150, Ec1531, and Erec482, specific for spp., / group, / group, clusters I and II (including /), , and / group, respectively. Although the canine and feline prebiotic literature is not as robust as that of humans, their use has gained steady support over the past decade. Recently research has focused upon the efficacy of various fibers as prebiotics in the canine and feline GIT.

Citation: Hernot D, Ogué E, Fahey G, Rastall R. 2008. Prebiotics and Synbiotics in Companion Animal Science, p 357-370. In Versalovic J, Wilson M (ed), Therapeutic Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815462.ch27

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Microbial Ecology
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Bacterial Proteins
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Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis
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Tables

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Table 1

Fructan content of selected feeds, pet foods, and food ingredients

Citation: Hernot D, Ogué E, Fahey G, Rastall R. 2008. Prebiotics and Synbiotics in Companion Animal Science, p 357-370. In Versalovic J, Wilson M (ed), Therapeutic Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815462.ch27
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Table 2

Summary of effects of prebiotics on microbial populations of dogs

Citation: Hernot D, Ogué E, Fahey G, Rastall R. 2008. Prebiotics and Synbiotics in Companion Animal Science, p 357-370. In Versalovic J, Wilson M (ed), Therapeutic Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815462.ch27
Generic image for table
Table 3

List of carbohydrates (prebiotics and nonprebiotics) used as substrates for bacterial growth

Citation: Hernot D, Ogué E, Fahey G, Rastall R. 2008. Prebiotics and Synbiotics in Companion Animal Science, p 357-370. In Versalovic J, Wilson M (ed), Therapeutic Microbiology. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815462.ch27

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