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Chapter 16 : Trypanosomatidae: Species, (Chagas Disease), and Associated Complications

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Trypanosomatidae: Species, (Chagas Disease), and Associated Complications, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter explains the postinfectious sequelae and long-term consequences of leishmaniasis and Chagas disease. A section discusses the long-term consequences and sequelae of leishmaniasis, with special emphasis on the long-term evolution of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) of immunosuppressed patients, post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis, the complications and scars resulting from localized CL (LCL), some particularly long-lasting forms of CL, and mucosal involvement of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL) and their disfiguring involvement and further sequelae. Treatment of all the leishmaniases remains difficult, due to the multiplicity of the existing species and their variable susceptibility to the available drugs, which are old, toxic, and expensive products. Chagas disease is an infectious disease resulting from the parasitism of humans by , a parasite of wild and domestic mammals, transmitted by blood-sucking triatomine bugs. The major causes of morbidity and mortality at the chronic stage are cardiac involvement, referred as chronic Chagas heart disease, and the “mega”-syndromes of the gastrointestinal tract. The major indications of the two specific trypanocidal drugs are in the acute phase of Chagas disease when diagnosed, congenital infection and prevention of accidental laboratory infections.

Citation: Dedet J. 2009. Trypanosomatidae: Species, (Chagas Disease), and Associated Complications, p 275-289. In Fratamico P, Smith J, Brogden K (ed), Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815486.ch16

Key Concept Ranking

Parasitic Diseases
0.69995296
Infectious Diseases
0.55363727
Leishmania donovani
0.49841684
Clinical Infection Stages
0.4977508
Immune Systems
0.49765363
Amphotericin B
0.4955397
0.69995296
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Figure 2.

Postmortem megacolon, during digestive chronic Chagas disease.

Citation: Dedet J. 2009. Trypanosomatidae: Species, (Chagas Disease), and Associated Complications, p 275-289. In Fratamico P, Smith J, Brogden K (ed), Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815486.ch16
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References

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Tables

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Citation: Dedet J. 2009. Trypanosomatidae: Species, (Chagas Disease), and Associated Complications, p 275-289. In Fratamico P, Smith J, Brogden K (ed), Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815486.ch16
Generic image for table
Table 1.

Main genera of the trypanosomatid family according to their respective morphological stages

Citation: Dedet J. 2009. Trypanosomatidae: Species, (Chagas Disease), and Associated Complications, p 275-289. In Fratamico P, Smith J, Brogden K (ed), Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815486.ch16
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Simplified classification of the genus derived from the phylogenetic analysis based on isoenzymes ( )

Citation: Dedet J. 2009. Trypanosomatidae: Species, (Chagas Disease), and Associated Complications, p 275-289. In Fratamico P, Smith J, Brogden K (ed), Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815486.ch16
Generic image for table
Table 3.

Usual tropisms and clinical expressions of the main anthropophilic species of

Citation: Dedet J. 2009. Trypanosomatidae: Species, (Chagas Disease), and Associated Complications, p 275-289. In Fratamico P, Smith J, Brogden K (ed), Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815486.ch16

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