1887

Chapter 28 : Concluding Perspectives of Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases—What’s Next?

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $15.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Concluding Perspectives of Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases—What’s Next?, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555815486/9781555814304_Chap28-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555815486/9781555814304_Chap28-2.gif

Abstract:

There are obstacles in establishing the concept that some infectious diseases may have sequelae with long-term consequences. This chapter overviews the sequelae of infectious agents, presents the economic burdens associated with these infections, and suggests future directions to progress this concept. Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide and the third leading cause of death in the United States. Sequelae, of course, are the pathological conditions resulting from a prior disease. There are many chronic syndromes and diseases for which there is a suspicion of an infectious etiology. For example, and possibly other pathogens could be triggers of inflammatory bowel disease or Crohn’s disease. Diarrheal diseases rank third among the leading infectious causes of death worldwide. Infections involving biofilms will likely have sequelae. Biofilms are a common cause of persistent infections. Here, bacteria attach and aggregate in polymeric matrixes on various mucosal surfaces.

Citation: Fratamico P, Smith J, Brogden K. 2009. Concluding Perspectives of Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases—What’s Next?, p 487-493. In Fratamico P, Smith J, Brogden K (ed), Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815486.ch28

Key Concept Ranking

Infectious Diseases
0.51534116
Microbial Pathogenesis
0.50165206
Infectious Pathogens
0.500018
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
0.43724063
0.51534116
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555815486.ch28
1. American Gastroenterological Association. 2001. The burden of gastrointestinal diseases. http://www.gastro.org/clinicalRes/pdf/burden-report.pdf. Accessed 15 August 2008.
2. Anderson, G. G.,, J. J. Palermo,, J. D. Schilling,, R. Roth,, J. Heuser, and, S. J. Hultgren. 2003. Intracellular bacterial biofilm-like pods in urinary tract infections. Science 301:105107.
3. Brogden, K. A.,, and J. M. Guthmiller (ed.). 2002. Polymicrobial Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
4. Brogden, K. A.,, and J. M. Guthmiller. 2003. Polymicrobial diseases, a concept whose time has come. ASM News 69:6973.
5. Chesson, H. W.,, J. M. Blandford,, T. L. Gift,, G. Tao, and, K. L. Irwin. 2004. The estimated direct medical cost of sexually transmitted diseases among American youth, 2000. Perspect. Sex. Reprod. Health 36:1119.
6. Costerton, J. W.,, P. S. Stewart, and, E. P. Greenberg. 1999. Bacterial biofilms: a common cause of persistent infections. Science 284:13181322.
7. Fauci, A. S. 2001. Infectious diseases: considerations for the 21st century. Clin. Infect. Dis. 32:675685.
8. Frenzen, P. D. 2008. Economic cost of Guillain-Barré syndrome in the United States. Neurology 71:2127.
9. Halperin, J. J. 2008. Prolonged Lyme disease treatment: enough is enough. Neurology 70:986987.
10. Helms, M.,, P. Vastrup,, P. Gerner-Smidt, and, K. Molbak. 2003. Short and long term mortality associated with foodborne bacterial gastrointestinal infections: registry based study. Brit. Med. J. 326:357.
11. Honeyman, M. C.,, B. S. Coulson,, N. L. Stone,, S. A. Gellert,, P. N. Goldwater,, C. E. Steele,, J. J. Couper,, B. D. Tait,, P. G. Colman, and, L. C. Harrison. 2000. Association between rotavirus infection and pancreatic islet autoimmunity in children at risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Diabetes 49:13191324.
12. Klempner, M. S.,, L. T. Hu,, J. Evans,, C. H. Schmid,, G. M. Johnson,, R. P. Trevino,, D. Norton,, L. Levy,, D. Wall,, J. Mc-Call,, M. Kosinski, and, A. Weinstein. 2001. Two controlled trials of antibiotic treatment in patients with persistent symptoms and a history of Lyme disease. N. Engl. J. Med. 345:8592.
13. Kobelt, G.,, P. Andlin-Sobocki,, S. Brophy,, L. Jonsson,, A. Calin, and, J. Braun. 2004. The burden of ankylosing spondylitis and the cost-effectiveness of treatment with infliximab (Remicade). Rheumatology 43:11581166.
14. Lindsay, J. A. 1997. Chronic sequelae of foodborne disease. Emerg. Infect. Dis. 3:443452.
15. Lorber, B. 1996. Are all diseases infectious? Ann. Intern. Med. 125:844851.
16. Lorber, B. 1999. Are all diseases infectious? Another look. Ann. Intern. Med. 131:989990.
17. Lorber, B. 2005. Infection and mental illness: do bugs make us batty? Anaerobe 11:303307.
18. Mah, T. F.,, and G. A. O’Toole. 2001. Mechanisms of biofilm resistance to antimicrobial agents. Trends Microbiol. 9:3439.
19. Nachamkin, I.,, B. M. Allos, and, T. W. Ho. 2000. Camypylobacter jejuni infection and the association with Guillain-Barré syndrome, p. 155–175. In I. Nachamkin and, M. L. Blaser (ed.), Campylobacter, 2nd ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
20. Parsek, M. R.,, and P. K. Singh. 2003. Bacterial biofilms: an emerging link to disease pathogenesis. Annu. Rev. Microbiol. 57:677701.
21. Pisani, P.,, D. M. Parkin,, N. Munoz, and, J. Ferlay. 1997. Cancer and infection: estimates of the attributable fraction in 1990. Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. 6:387400.
22. Russo, T. A.,, and J. R. Johnson. 2003. Medical and economic impact of extraintestinal infections due to Escherichia coli: focus on an increasingly important endemic problem. Microbes Infect. 5:449456.
23. Smith, J. L.,, and D. Bayles. 2007. Postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome: a long-term consequence of bacterial gastroenteritis. J. Food Prot. 70:17621769.
24. Starner, T. D.,, N. Zhang,, G. Kim,, M. A. Apicella, and, P. B. McCray, Jr. 2006. Haemophilus influenzae forms biofilms on airway epithelia: implications in cystic fibrosis. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 174:213220.
25. Stricker, R. B.,, and L. Johnson. 2007. Lyme disease: a turning point. Expert Rev. Anti Infect. Ther. 5:759762.
26. Torsvik, V.,, and L. Ovreas. 2002. Microbial diversity and function in soil: from genes to ecosystems. Curr. Opin. Microbiol. 5:240245.
27. Veeh, R. H.,, M. E. Shirtliff,, J. R. Petik,, J. A. Flood,, C. C. Davis,, J. L. Seymour,, M. A. Hansmann,, K. M. Kerr,, M. E. Pasmore, and, J. W. Costerton. 2003. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm on tampons and menses components. J. Infect. Dis. 188:519530.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1.

Examples of sequelae induced by acute and chronic infections caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites

Citation: Fratamico P, Smith J, Brogden K. 2009. Concluding Perspectives of Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases—What’s Next?, p 487-493. In Fratamico P, Smith J, Brogden K (ed), Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815486.ch28

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error