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Chapter 29 : Quorum Sensing in Rotifers

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Quorum Sensing in Rotifers, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Rotifer quorum-sensing is similar in many respects to the more intensely studied bacterial quorum-sensing processes, suggesting that chemosensory processes for assessing conspecific population density may have ancient origins. The apparent involvement of the human steroidogenesis-inducing protein (SIP) in steroid production suggests a similar role for the rotifer mixis-inducing protein (MIP), such that MIP quorum sensing could trigger steroid hormone production in female rotifers, leading to meiotic oogenesis. Population genetics approaches can be used to determine when the mixis pathways of different groups of rotifers diverge and to test hypotheses related to the importance of rotifer mixis in evolutionary processes. The trade-offs between accurate population assessment and the energy costs associated with loss of a complex signaling molecule to the environment have been recognized in bacterial quorum sensing and may apply similarly to rotifers. Quorum sensing among rotifers, therefore, would be analogous to cell-cell communication between tissues of a complex multicellular organism-both require coordination, whether of animal behavior or cell physiology. Induction of sexual reproduction in rotifers satisfies the conditions that define quorum sensing, including the production and release of an autoinducing chemical cue (MIP) by rotifers in a density-dependent manner, the response by conspecifics upon reaching a threshold concentration, and the coordination of this response, which includes both physiological and behavioral changes.

Citation: Kubanek J, Snell T. 2008. Quorum Sensing in Rotifers, p 453-461. In Winans S, Bassler B (ed), Chemical Communication among Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815578.ch29

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Quorum Sensing
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High-Performance Liquid Chromatography
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Signal Transduction
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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Evidence for a population density-dependent, nonlinear response on rotifer sex induction (mixis). The axis label refers to the volume of water in which a single female rotifer was cultured for 48 h, and the axis reports the percentage of her daughters that became mictic (thus, produced males). Redrawn from ( ) with kind permission of Springer Science and Business Media.

Citation: Kubanek J, Snell T. 2008. Quorum Sensing in Rotifers, p 453-461. In Winans S, Bassler B (ed), Chemical Communication among Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815578.ch29
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Conceptual model for quorum sensing in the rotifer , in which the MIP acts as autoinducer, and interaction of the MIP with a chemoreceptor located on the body surface of female conspecifics induces mixis in 10 to 30% of the population, once a threshold of approximately 71 females per liter has been reached.

Citation: Kubanek J, Snell T. 2008. Quorum Sensing in Rotifers, p 453-461. In Winans S, Bassler B (ed), Chemical Communication among Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815578.ch29
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Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

(Top) High-performance liquid chromatogram of mixis-inducing fraction from conditioned medium of the rotifer , using a C reversed-phase column with gradient elution of aqueous methanol (AU, absorbance units at 280 nm; numbers above peaks refer to retention times). (Bottom) Mixis activity of HPLC fractions (11 to 25 min retention time). NC, negative control; PC, positive control; numbers inside of bars indicate number of females scored; asterisks indicate data significantly greater than negative control data by G test. Reprinted from ( ) with kind permission of Springer Science and Business Media.

Citation: Kubanek J, Snell T. 2008. Quorum Sensing in Rotifers, p 453-461. In Winans S, Bassler B (ed), Chemical Communication among Bacteria. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815578.ch29
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