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Chapter 14 : Recent Trends in Outbreaks of Salmonellosis in the United States

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Recent Trends in Outbreaks of Salmonellosis in the United States, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Salmonellosis, a disease caused by organisms in the genus , presents a major health burden in the United States. This chapter reviews current trends in the incidence of infections and the occurrence of salmonellosis outbreaks, along with recent findings regarding the foods through which these infections are transmitted. In the first few decades of the 20th century, salmonellosis was an important public health problem in Europe, often through outbreaks. In the United States, nontyphoidal salmonellosis increased in public health importance after 1950, just as typhoid fever, caused by serotype Typhi, was declining. In the United States, salmonellosis is tracked nationally through complementary clinical case and laboratory-based surveillance systems and through active surveillance in sentinel sites. The presentation of salmonellosis outbreaks has been evolving, related in part to particular biologic characteristics of the organism and to the sensitivity of our surveillance techniques. The incidence of human salmonellosis measured through laboratory-based surveillance has varied over the last several decades. Recent developments in salmonellosis outbreaks due to specific foods are discussed in the chapter. The decline in serotype Enteritidis infections and related outbreaks is one of the most important recent trends in the epidemiology of salmonellosis. The resistance of to antimicrobial agents is an ongoing concern for both clinicians and public health officials. Most infections do not require treatment with antimicrobial agents; however, the emergence of drug-resistant strains can complicate treatment of extraintestinal infections and has been associated with more frequent and longer hospitalizations.

Citation: Lynch M. 2008. Recent Trends in Outbreaks of Salmonellosis in the United States, p 277-292. In Scheld W, Hammer S, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 8. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815592.ch14
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Figures

Image of Figure 1.
Figure 1.

Isolation rates for all and selected serotypes in the United States from 1970 to 2005. Data are from PHLIS.

Citation: Lynch M. 2008. Recent Trends in Outbreaks of Salmonellosis in the United States, p 277-292. In Scheld W, Hammer S, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 8. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815592.ch14
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Image of Figure 2.
Figure 2.

Relative rates compared with a 1996 to 1998 baseline period of laboratory-diagnosed cases in FoodNet sites of infection with , Shiga toxin-producing O157 (STEC O157), , and , by year, United States, 1996 to 2006.

Citation: Lynch M. 2008. Recent Trends in Outbreaks of Salmonellosis in the United States, p 277-292. In Scheld W, Hammer S, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 8. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815592.ch14
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Image of Figure 3.
Figure 3.

Number of outbreaks of salmonellosis due to selected serotypes, by year, 1998 to 2006. Data are from the CDC Foodborne Outbreak Surveillance System.

Citation: Lynch M. 2008. Recent Trends in Outbreaks of Salmonellosis in the United States, p 277-292. In Scheld W, Hammer S, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 8. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815592.ch14
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Image of Figure 4.
Figure 4.

Number of serotype Enteritidis (SE) outbreaks in which the food vehicle was determined, by egg status of implicated food, and number of serotype Enteritidis surveillance cases, United States, 1985 to 2004.

Citation: Lynch M. 2008. Recent Trends in Outbreaks of Salmonellosis in the United States, p 277-292. In Scheld W, Hammer S, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 8. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815592.ch14
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1.

Food-borne outbreaks of salmonellosis reported, 1998 to 2002, by implicated vehicle

Citation: Lynch M. 2008. Recent Trends in Outbreaks of Salmonellosis in the United States, p 277-292. In Scheld W, Hammer S, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 8. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815592.ch14
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Multistate outbreaks associated with tomatoes, United States, 1990 to 2006

Citation: Lynch M. 2008. Recent Trends in Outbreaks of Salmonellosis in the United States, p 277-292. In Scheld W, Hammer S, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 8. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815592.ch14

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