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Chapter 16 : Phage-Shaping Evolution of Bacterial Pathogenicity and Resistance

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Abstract:

Bacteriophages (so-called phages), viruses that infect bacteria, are the most abundant and varied biological group on the planet, with ~108 different phage species representing an estimated global population on the order of ~1031 viral particles. The field of phages as biotherapeutic agents has been rediscovered, as several experiments have demonstrated their potential for treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. In addition to the classical virulence factors described in prophages, the “genomic era” has revealed new pathogenicity factors linked to prophages. Several examples of antibiotic resistance genes spread by generalized or specialized transduction have been described. For instance, resistance to imipenem, aztreonam, and ceftazidime in Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be transduced by two phages, AP-2 and AP-12. Phages can also transduce resistance to chloramphenicol in E. coli, methicillin in Staphylococcus epidermidis, novobiocin or tetracycline in Staphylococcus aureus, or tetracycline and chloramphenicol in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. There are few examples of bacteriophages harboring antibiotic resistance genes. An interesting example is the presence of the ars operon in the skin element of Bacillus subtilis, which confers resistance to arsenate. One of the mechanisms of macrolide resistance found in streptococci is mediated by the proton-dependent efflux pump encoded by mef (A). Two main lines of research have been opened to find novel anti-infectives. The first is using lytic enzymes to weaken the bacterial cell wall of specific bacteria. The second line of research consists of using bacteriophages to design protein-like chemical compounds that arrest critical cellular processes.

Citation: Galán J. 2008. Phage-Shaping Evolution of Bacterial Pathogenicity and Resistance, p 167-184. In Baquero F, Nombela C, Cassell G, Gutiérrez-Fuentes J (ed), Evolutionary Biology of Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815639.ch16
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Figures

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Figure 1.

Although phage and host are both striving for their own survival, they have opposite interests. Only in the lysogenic (prophage) stage do they have common interests because both need the other for different reasons.

Citation: Galán J. 2008. Phage-Shaping Evolution of Bacterial Pathogenicity and Resistance, p 167-184. In Baquero F, Nombela C, Cassell G, Gutiérrez-Fuentes J (ed), Evolutionary Biology of Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815639.ch16
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References

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Tables

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Table 1.

Some examples of phages carrying virulence factors in gram-positive bacteria

Citation: Galán J. 2008. Phage-Shaping Evolution of Bacterial Pathogenicity and Resistance, p 167-184. In Baquero F, Nombela C, Cassell G, Gutiérrez-Fuentes J (ed), Evolutionary Biology of Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815639.ch16
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Some examples of phages carrying virulence factors in gram-negative bacteria

Citation: Galán J. 2008. Phage-Shaping Evolution of Bacterial Pathogenicity and Resistance, p 167-184. In Baquero F, Nombela C, Cassell G, Gutiérrez-Fuentes J (ed), Evolutionary Biology of Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815639.ch16

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