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Chapter 109 : Use of Real-Time PCR for Detection and Quantification of Bacteria in Water on the Scale of a Watershed: the Vidourle Valley

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Use of Real-Time PCR for Detection and Quantification of Bacteria in Water on the Scale of a Watershed: the Vidourle Valley, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

bacterium is present naturally in ground water and has been described as a new pathogen growing in water distribution systems. Real-time PCR is a technology that permits us to quantify, in a rapid, sensitive, and reliable way, the genomic units of bacteria in water. The authors of this chapter have used real-time PCR to study the presence of bacteria in the environment and in water distribution networks. They have quantified spp. and in natural water, water distributed in the urban network following disinfectant treatment, and waste water from domestic and industrial use. The water microbiology was studied by ATP measurements and enumeration of by culture and by real-time PCR. Thirty natural water samples were collected along the Vidourle river. Six waste water samples were collected in the three towns. PCR results were higher in natural water than in distributed water and lower than in waste water. In this study, real-time PCR shed light on the presence of species flora in natural water along Vidourle Valley watershed. Proliferating in biofilms and in amoebae, the species may be a useful indicator for the estimation of the total microbiological quality of water. ATP-metry can also be an interesting tool for the characterization of the microbiological quality of water.

Citation: Garrelly L, Minervini C, Rolland L, Pistre S, Personné J. 2006. Use of Real-Time PCR for Detection and Quantification of Bacteria in Water on the Scale of a Watershed: the Vidourle Valley, p 456-459. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch109

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Ground Water
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Real-Time PCR
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Water Treatment Plants
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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Correlation between real-time PCR and ATP-metry.

Citation: Garrelly L, Minervini C, Rolland L, Pistre S, Personné J. 2006. Use of Real-Time PCR for Detection and Quantification of Bacteria in Water on the Scale of a Watershed: the Vidourle Valley, p 456-459. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch109
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Evolution of spp. contamination in three towns.

Citation: Garrelly L, Minervini C, Rolland L, Pistre S, Personné J. 2006. Use of Real-Time PCR for Detection and Quantification of Bacteria in Water on the Scale of a Watershed: the Vidourle Valley, p 456-459. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch109
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Download as Powerpoint

References

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