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Chapter 128 : Efficacy of Monochloramine against Surface-Associated in a Cooling Tower Model System

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Efficacy of Monochloramine against Surface-Associated in a Cooling Tower Model System, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Efficacy of monochloramine against mature biofilms formed in a model recirculating water system was compared on different surfaces under identical conditions. A laboratory-scale cooling tower was designed to simulate a wet evaporative cooling system, which was experimentally seeded with . Rather low inoculum was added to the model system to mimic the natural entry of from the water supply. Biofilm had been allowed to grow on coupons, and the model system was disinfected after a 180-day period with monochloramine. Three coupons of each material were removed from the basin and dip-rinsed in sterile phosphate buffer to remove unattached cells. The bacterial densities in biofilms from different materials after disinfection (180 min, 1.5 ppm dose) suggested a material-dependent activity of monochloramine. Monochloramine was found ineffective against microorganisms on polypropylene (PP) and galvanized steel surfaces. Results indicated that monochloramine shows material-dependent activity in the cooling tower model system and it has long residual activity at high temperatures and pH levels, leading to improved performance in recirculating water. This observation supports the material-dependent activity of monochloramine and it could be explained by the formation of dissimilar biofilms on different surfaces, which affects the architecture of the biofilm matrix. Chemical disinfection is strongly recommended from the beginning of the tower operation to prevent or reduce the occurrence of Legionnaires’ disease. Monochloramine disinfection is inexpensive and could be used in automatic injection devices instead of chlorine.

Citation: Türetgen I, Çotuk A. 2006. Efficacy of Monochloramine against Surface-Associated in a Cooling Tower Model System, p 529-532. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch128

Key Concept Ranking

Surface Water
0.6262415
Legionella pneumophila
0.60294116
0.6262415
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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

HPC counts on surfaces before and after disinfection.

Citation: Türetgen I, Çotuk A. 2006. Efficacy of Monochloramine against Surface-Associated in a Cooling Tower Model System, p 529-532. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch128
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

counts on surfaces before and after disinfection.

Citation: Türetgen I, Çotuk A. 2006. Efficacy of Monochloramine against Surface-Associated in a Cooling Tower Model System, p 529-532. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch128
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Download as Powerpoint

References

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1. Bansal, N. S., and, F. McDonell. 1997. Identification and DNA fingerprinting of Legionella strains by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. J. Clin. Microbiol. 35:23102314.
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5. Fliermans, C. B.,, G. E. Bettinger, and, A. W. Fynsk. 1982. Treatment of cooling tower systems containing high levels of Legionella pneumophila, Water Res. 16:903909.
6. Türetgen, I. 2004. Comparison of free residual chlorine and monochloramine for efficacy against biofilms in model and full scale cooling towers. Biofouling 20:8185.
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8. Türetgen, I. and,, A. Cotuk. Formation of bacterial biofilms in model recirculating water system. J. Environ. Micropaleo. Microbiol. Meiobenth, in press.
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