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Chapter 129 : Monochloramine Treatment Induces a Viable-but-Nonculturable State into Biofilm and Planktonic Populations

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Monochloramine Treatment Induces a Viable-but-Nonculturable State into Biofilm and Planktonic Populations, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The aim of the authors' work was to study the impact of monochloramine on sessile and planktonic populations. The authors produced biofilms on glass beads (0.5 mm diameter) in buffered-yeast extract (BYE) broth. Bacteria were grown for one week at 37°C, under static conditions. Planktonic cells were obtained in same growth conditions without glass beads. Planktonic and sessile cells were washed twice with sterile water and then treated with 0.25 to 10 mg liter monochloramine solutions. Sessile bacteria were collected from glass beads by sonication and enumerated on buffered charcoal yeast extract (BCYE) agar. In order to detect metabolic activity in viable-but-nonculturable (VBNC) cells, planktonic Lens cells were treated with 0.75 mg liter of monochloramine in order to obtain no culturable cells. After 8 days in the resting medium, the authors were able to detect esterase activity and membrane integrity by fluorescence microscopy using the ChemChrom V6 substratum (Chemunex) in samples without culturable cells. This demonstrates that VBNC cells produced by monochloramine retained metabolic activity. Recovery of culturability was observed for sessile bacteria treated with 1 mg liter of monochloramine and coincubated with .

Citation: Alleron L, Frère J, Merlet N, Legube B. 2006. Monochloramine Treatment Induces a Viable-but-Nonculturable State into Biofilm and Planktonic Populations, p 533-537. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch129

Key Concept Ranking

Legionella pneumophila
0.5743126
Acanthamoeba castellanii
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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Culturability and viability of Paris after monochloramine treatment. After monochloramine treatments, biofilms were transferred into resting medium (see text for details) and incubated at 20°C for 6 days. Squares indicate culturable cells enumerated on BCYE agar, and circles, viable cells enumerated by epifluorescence using the BacLight Kit, as cells cm (Molecular Probes).

Citation: Alleron L, Frère J, Merlet N, Legube B. 2006. Monochloramine Treatment Induces a Viable-but-Nonculturable State into Biofilm and Planktonic Populations, p 533-537. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch129
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Esterase activity of Lens 8 days after a 0.75mg liter monochloramine treatment. The white line represents 10 μm.

Citation: Alleron L, Frère J, Merlet N, Legube B. 2006. Monochloramine Treatment Induces a Viable-but-Nonculturable State into Biofilm and Planktonic Populations, p 533-537. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch129
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References

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1. Abu Kwaik, Y.,, C. Venkataraman,, O. S. Harb, and, L. Y. Gao. 1998. Signal transduction in the protozoan host Hartmannella vermiformis upon attachment and invasion by Legionella micdadei. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:31343139.
2. Bej, A. K.,, M. H. Mahbubani, and, R. M. Atlas. 1991. Detection of viable Legionella pneumophila in water by polymerase chain reaction and gene probe methods. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57: 597600.
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Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

Influence of on culturability of sessile Paris treated with monochloramine

Citation: Alleron L, Frère J, Merlet N, Legube B. 2006. Monochloramine Treatment Induces a Viable-but-Nonculturable State into Biofilm and Planktonic Populations, p 533-537. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch129

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