1887

Chapter 131 : Environmental Sampling Data to Determine Risk: a United Kingdom Perspective

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $15.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Environmental Sampling Data to Determine Risk: a United Kingdom Perspective, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555815660/9781555813901_Chap131-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555815660/9781555813901_Chap131-2.gif

Abstract:

This chapter presents the panel responses to questions posed to the round table discussion “Environmental Sampling Data to Determine Risk". A risk assessment (RA) should be carried out in all premises that have public access and should include all healthcare premises, factories and office blocks. An RA should include a thorough site survey for all water systems in use, cooling towers, hot and cold water systems, spa pools, irrigation systems and should take into account the population using the premises. PCR can be used with the following provisos: there are still some issues around the sensitivity and specificity of PCR for legionellae, especially around the target sequences for the genus. The problems associated with thermostatic mixing valves (TMVs) are mainly associated with the fact that the temperature downstream of these is within the ideal range for microbial growth. A period of intensive monitoring should be undertaken including aerobic colony counts (not dipslides) combined with testing, ideally using both culture and PCR. The ecological determinants of colonization are common to all systems. Temperature, nutrients, presence of other microorganisms, and stagnation are all major predictors of growth. As a result, ecological determinants can be readily standardized across a wide range of systems, but risk assessment cannot.

Citation: Surman-Lee S, Bentham R. 2006. Environmental Sampling Data to Determine Risk: a United Kingdom Perspective, p 543-548. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch131

Key Concept Ranking

Legionella pneumophila
0.65789473
Risk Assessment
0.5150304
0.65789473
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555815660.ch131
1. van der Zee, A.,, M. Peeters,, C. de Jong,, H. Verbakel,, J. W. Crielaard,, E. C. J. Claas, and, K. E. Templeton. 2002. Novel PCR-probe assay for detection of and discrimination between Legionella pneumophila and other Legionella species in clinical samples J. Clin. Microbiol. 40: 11241125.
2. WHO (World Health Organization). 2004. Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality, 3rd ed., chapter 4. World Health Organization.

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

Water safety plan approach for a hot water system (after reference )

Citation: Surman-Lee S, Bentham R. 2006. Environmental Sampling Data to Determine Risk: a United Kingdom Perspective, p 543-548. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch131

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error