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Chapter 35 : Representative Survey of the Scope of Legionnaires’ Disease and of Diagnostic Methods and Transmission Control Practices in Germany

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Representative Survey of the Scope of Legionnaires’ Disease and of Diagnostic Methods and Transmission Control Practices in Germany, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter provides a representative overview of the scope of Legionnaire's disease (LD) and assess the type and frequency of implemented diagnostic methods and transmission control practices. A questionnaire was sent to the clinical directors (with two reminders) of each selected hospital. The anonymous survey included questions about hospital demographics (type of hospital, bed count, presence of risk patients [neonates, oncological, transplanted, HIV positive, and immunsuppressed ICU patients]), episodes of nosocomial and community-acquired LD in the past 5 years, diagnostic testing for LD, environmental sampling practices and the results obtained, as well as questions about prophylactic measurements and maintenance of hospital water systems in general and especially for high-risk patients. 56 out of 60 (93%) of the hospitals sample their water (peripheral and/or central) for , 31 (55%) with positive results. Of the two hospitals reporting nosocomial LD, only one had positive sampling results, while the other one did not detect . Considering the high costs of testing for and for LD prevention, further research is indicated to establish standard procedures concerning low- and high-risk patients.

Citation: Eckmanns T, Poorbiazar M, Rüden H, Fritz L. 2006. Representative Survey of the Scope of Legionnaires’ Disease and of Diagnostic Methods and Transmission Control Practices in Germany, p 132-134. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch35

Key Concept Ranking

Chlorine Dioxide
0.55263156
Legionella
0.42338708
Water
0.40773246
0.55263156
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References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555815660.ch35
1. Joseph, C. A. 2004. Legionnaires’ disease in Europe 2000-2002. Epidemiol. Infect. 132:417424.
2. Marston, B. J.,, H. B. Lipman, and, R. F. Breiman. 1994. Surveillance for Legionnaires’ disease. Risk factors for morbidity and mortality. Arch. Intern. Med. 154:24172422.

Tables

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TABLE 1

Measurements for potable water decontamination in 43 hospitals

Citation: Eckmanns T, Poorbiazar M, Rüden H, Fritz L. 2006. Representative Survey of the Scope of Legionnaires’ Disease and of Diagnostic Methods and Transmission Control Practices in Germany, p 132-134. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch35
Generic image for table
TABLE 2

Measurements for high-risk patients in 17 hospitals

Citation: Eckmanns T, Poorbiazar M, Rüden H, Fritz L. 2006. Representative Survey of the Scope of Legionnaires’ Disease and of Diagnostic Methods and Transmission Control Practices in Germany, p 132-134. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch35

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