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Chapter 68 : New Insights into Pathogenesis of Infection: from Bedside Findings to Animal Models

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New Insights into Pathogenesis of Infection: from Bedside Findings to Animal Models, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

is a gram-negative intracellular pathogen that often causes a serious and life-threatening pneumonia. In lung tissue, bacteria multiply in several types of host cells, including macrophages, monocytes, and alveolar epithelial cells. In this paper, the authors present topics concerning the pathogenesis of infections, such as exaggeration of acute lung injury by hyperoxia and a role of quorum-sensing molecules in the ecological niche of organisms. The authors first examined the effects of hyperoxia on survival in permissive A/J and nonpermissive C57BL/6 mice with pneumonia. Importantly, hyperoxia treatment alone (90 to 94% oxygen for 60 h), without infection, induced no death of mice in either strain. Histone-associated DNA fragments are a marker for DNA fragmentation, one of the main characteristics of apoptosis, whereas caspase-3 is an essential protease mediating apoptosis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling staining of infected lung sections demonstrated increased apoptosis in hyperoxic mice, predominantly in macrophages (alveolar and interstitial) and alveolar epithelial cells. The growth of was completely inhibited by 50 μM of N-3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C-HSL), and interestingly significant suppressions of virulence factor genes were demonstrated in exposed to 3-oxo-C-HSL.

Citation: Tateda K, Kimura S, T. Fuse E, Yamaguchi K. 2006. New Insights into Pathogenesis of Infection: from Bedside Findings to Animal Models, p 278-282. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch68

Key Concept Ranking

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
0.503628
Legionella pneumophila
0.4174811
0.503628
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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Effects of hyperoxia on survival of mice with pneumonia. Mice were infected with and and then kept in room air or hyperoxia (90% O) for 60 h. Survival of mice was observed for 8 days after infection. Reprinted from reference with permission.

Citation: Tateda K, Kimura S, T. Fuse E, Yamaguchi K. 2006. New Insights into Pathogenesis of Infection: from Bedside Findings to Animal Models, p 278-282. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch68
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Changes of lung weight and albumin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice with pneumonia in the setting of hyperoxia. Mice were intratracheally infected with and then kept in room air or hyperoxia. Lung weight, albumin in BALF, histone-DNA, and caspase-3 in the lung were examined on day 2 (n = 5). * < 0.05. Reprinted from reference with permission.

Citation: Tateda K, Kimura S, T. Fuse E, Yamaguchi K. 2006. New Insights into Pathogenesis of Infection: from Bedside Findings to Animal Models, p 278-282. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch68
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Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

Effects of 3-oxo-C-HSL on growth of bacteria. Bacteria were incubated in liquid medium for 24 h with 50 μM of 3-oxo-C-HSL, and optical densities were examined. Reprinted from reference with permission.

Citation: Tateda K, Kimura S, T. Fuse E, Yamaguchi K. 2006. New Insights into Pathogenesis of Infection: from Bedside Findings to Animal Models, p 278-282. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch68
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References

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