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Chapter 90 : Characterization of Sessile and Planktonic in Model Biofilms

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Characterization of Sessile and Planktonic in Model Biofilms, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The majority of /biofilm studies that have been conducted employ naturally occurring microbial communities. These have evaluated the effect of temperature and surface materials on the growth of as well as the effect of biocides on planktonic and sessile bacteria. This study indicated that may persist in biofilms in the absence of amoebae, but in the model, the amoebae were required for multiplication of the bacteria. A number of bacterial cell structures and factors have been shown to be critical for biofilm formation. These include flagella, quorum-sensing factors, polysaccharides, and pili. The biofilm model described by Murga et al. was used to compare these strains in the presence of heterotrophic bacteria (, , and spp.) with and without the amoeba . Both strain BS100 and NU243 show a significant decrease in retention in the biofilm in the absence of amoebae. The bacteria were harvested from buffered charcoal yeast extract agar plates and inoculated in various broth media. Tap water was pumped into the reactor, creating the flow and eventually diluting out the broth. The total concentration of (viable count) shows an indistinguishable response to challenge with live or killed or . The addition of host amoeba cells allows to persist in the sessile and planktonic fractions of the biofilm reactor for extended periods of time.

Citation: S. Fields B, Lucas C. 2006. Characterization of Sessile and Planktonic in Model Biofilms, p 383-389. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch90

Key Concept Ranking

Type II Secretion System
0.46257898
Type IV Pili
0.41434216
0.46257898
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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

(A) Biofilm-associated without amoebae. (B) Biofilm-associated with amoebae.

Citation: S. Fields B, Lucas C. 2006. Characterization of Sessile and Planktonic in Model Biofilms, p 383-389. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch90
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

concentration in the simplified model comprised of and .

Citation: S. Fields B, Lucas C. 2006. Characterization of Sessile and Planktonic in Model Biofilms, p 383-389. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch90
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Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

Viable counts of (A) in biofilm, (B) planktonic, and (C) in effluent.

Citation: S. Fields B, Lucas C. 2006. Characterization of Sessile and Planktonic in Model Biofilms, p 383-389. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch90
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Image of FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4

FlaA expression (A) in biofilm, (B) planktonic, and (C) in effluent.

Citation: S. Fields B, Lucas C. 2006. Characterization of Sessile and Planktonic in Model Biofilms, p 383-389. In Cianciotto N, Kwaik Y, Edelstein P, Fields B, Geary D, Harrison T, Joseph C, Ratcliff R, Stout J, Swanson M (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815660.ch90
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References

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11. Storey, M. V.,, J. Langmark,, N. J. Ashbolt, and, T. A. Stenstrom. 2004. The fate of legionellae within distribution pipe biofilms: measurement of their persistence, inactivation, and detachment. Water Sci. Tech. 49:269275.
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