1887

Chapter 5 : Sanitation and Hygiene Deficiencies as Contributing Factors in Contamination of Imported Foods

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Sanitation and Hygiene Deficiencies as Contributing Factors in Contamination of Imported Foods, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555815745/9781555814137_Chap05-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555815745/9781555814137_Chap05-2.gif

Abstract:

Understanding the inadequacy and problems of sanitation and hygiene deficiencies and their contribution to food contamination in exporting countries can lead to opportunities to reduce contamination in imported foods and to support efforts to reduce food safety problems in export partners. This chapter focuses on the sanitation and hygiene deficiencies in imported food. In general, those problems are more prominent in developing countries where food quality control is poorer than in industrialized countries. Sections in the chapter include presentation of evidence on food safety problems from imports, some cases related to hygiene and sanitation issues in exporting countries, and discussion of food safety activities in food production, especially in developing countries. Discussion about the challenges and progress suggest opportunities for developing safe food supply chains. The quality and safety of imported foods are at risk because of the food safety practices of the exporting countries and the likelihood that sanitation and hygiene deficiencies would be imported along with the food items. Food-borne pathogens can be transmitted from human excreta though improper sanitation, water sources, insects, and soil. The chapter primarily focuses on human sources and exposures. Main issues in developing countries regarding food safety controls are inadequate technology, equipment, and other infrastructure for testing product quality. A two-tiered system may be best for developing countries because improvement of an entire country’s sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) situations may take time.

Citation: Dong F, Jensen H. 2008. Sanitation and Hygiene Deficiencies as Contributing Factors in Contamination of Imported Foods, p 139-158. In Doyle M, Erickson M (ed), Imported Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815745.ch5

Key Concept Ranking

Food Safety Regulations and Control
0.48253265
0.48253265
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555815745.ch05
1. Becker, G. S., 2007. U.S. food and agricultural imports: safeguards and selected issues. Congressional Research Service Report for Congress. Updated 8 November 2007. [Online.] http://www.nationalaglawcenter.org/assets/crs/RL34198.pdf. Accessed 3 December 2007.
2. Bolanos, E.,, P. Fernandez,, E. Perez, and, K. Walker. 2000. Situation of FTAA members for compliance with the WTO agreement on sanitary and phytosanitary measures. Comunica 4(15):4042. [Online.] http://www.iica.int/comuniica/n_15/art.asp?art=9. Accessed 27 November 2007.
3. Buzby,J. C.,, T. Roberts,, C. T. Lin, and, J. M. MacDonald. 1996. Bacterial foodborne disease: medical costs and productivity losses. Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Economic Report no. 741. [Online.] http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/aer741/aer741.pdf. Accessed 27 November 2007.
4. Calvin, L.,, L. Flores, and, W. Foster. 2003. Case study: Guatemalan raspberries and Cyclospora. In L. J. Unnevehr (ed.), Food Safety in Food Security and Food Trade, International Food Policy Research Institute 2020, Focus no. 10. [Online.] http://www.ifpri.org/2020/focus/focus10/focus10_07.pdf. Accessed 27 November 2007.
5. Calvin, L, B. Avendano, and R. Schwentesius., 2004 The economics of food safety: the case of green onions and hepatitis A outbreaks. Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Outlook Report no. VGS30501. [Online.] http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/vgs/nov04/VGS30501/VGS30501.pdf. Accessed 27 November 2007.
6. Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (CFSAN). 2001. FDA survey of imported fresh produce. [Online.] http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/prodsur6.html. Accessed 27 November 2007.
7. Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (CFSAN). 2003. FDA survey of domestic fresh produce. FY2000/2001 Field assignment. [Onlline.] http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/prodsu10.html. Accessed 27 November 2007.
8. Dohlman, E., and, M. Gehlhar. 2007. U.S. trade growth: a new beginning or a repeat of the past? Amber Waves, September issue. Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. [Online.] http://www.ers.usda.gov/AmberWaves/September07/Features/USTrade.htm. Accessed 27 November 2007.
9. Dong, F., and, H. H. Jensen. 2004. The challenge of conforming to sanitary and phytosanitary measures for China’s agricultural exports. MATRIC Working Paper 04-MWP 8. [Online.] http://www.econ.iastate.edu/research/webpapers/paper_11475.pdf. Accessed 27 November 2007.
10. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 2007. Import Refusal Report for OASIS. [Online.] http://www.fda.gov/ora/oasis/ora_oasis_ref.html. Accessed 27 November 2007.
11. Henson, S., 2003. The economics of food safety in developing countries. ESA Working Paper no. 03-19, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. [Online.] ftp://ftp. fao.org/docrep/fao/007/ae052e/ae052e00.pdf. Accessed 27 November 2007.
12. Henson, S.,, A.-M. Brouder, and, W. Mitullah. 2000. Food safety requirements and food exports from developing countries: the case of fish exports from Kenya to the European Union. Am.J.Agric. Econ. 82:11591169.
13. Horton, L., 1998. Food from developing countries: steps to improve compliance. Food Drug Law J. 53:139171.
14. International Council of Nurses. 2001. Food safety: an essential public health function of nurses. Fact Sheet (29/03/01). [Online.] http://www.icn.ch/matters_food.htm. Accessed 3 December 2007.
15. Ke, B., 2002. Perspectives and strategies for the livestock sector in China over the next three decades. Livestock Policy Discussion Paper no. 7. Food and Agriculture Organization, Livestock Information and Policy Branch, AGAL, August. [Online.] http://www.fao.org/ag/againfo/resources/en/publications/sector_discuss/PP_Nr7_Final.pdf. Accessed 27 November 2007.
16. Mitchell, L., 2003. Economic theory and conceptual relationships between food safety and international trade. In International Trade and Food Safety: Economic Theory and Case Study. Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Economic Report 828. [Online.] http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/aer828/aer828d.pdf. Accessed 27 November 2007.
17. Noor, H., 2002. Sanitary and phytosanitary measures and their impact on Kenya, Standards and Trade workshop, Geneva, Switzerland. 1617 May 2002. [Online.] http://www.unctad.org/trade_env/test1/meetings/standards/kenya3.doc. Accessed 4 January 2007.
18. Prüss, A.,, D. Kay,, L. Fewtrell, and, J. Bartram. 2002. Estimating the burden of disease from water, sanitation and hygiene at a global level. Environ. Health Perspect. 110(5):537542.
19. Unnevehr, L., and, N. Hirschhorn. 2000. Food safety issues in the developing world. World Bank Technical Paper no. 469, World Bank, Washington, DC.
20. Unnevehr, L., and, N. Hirschhorn. 2001. Designing effective food safety interventions in developing countries. [Online.] http://go.worldbank.org/Y0270X2TE0. Accessed 12 January 2007.
21. Walker, K. D., 1999. Political Dimensions of Food Safety, Trade, and Rural Growth. Presentation at the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA) World Bank Rural Week Conference, 26 March.
22. World Bank. 2005. The Impact of food safety and agricultural health standards on developing country exports. Summary of Report no. 31302, 10 January 2005. [Online.] http://www.standardsfacility.org/files/report31302.pdf. Accessed 27 November 2007.
23. World Health Organization (WHO). 2006. A guide to healthy food markets. [Online.] http://www.afro.who.int/des/fos/publications/healthy_food_book_2.pdf. Accessed 3 January 2007.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1

FDA import refusals by regions or country in 2007

Citation: Dong F, Jensen H. 2008. Sanitation and Hygiene Deficiencies as Contributing Factors in Contamination of Imported Foods, p 139-158. In Doyle M, Erickson M (ed), Imported Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815745.ch5
Generic image for table
Table 2

Food safety activities in food production

Citation: Dong F, Jensen H. 2008. Sanitation and Hygiene Deficiencies as Contributing Factors in Contamination of Imported Foods, p 139-158. In Doyle M, Erickson M (ed), Imported Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815745.ch5
Generic image for table
Table 3

Implementation of food safety controls based on level of economic development

Citation: Dong F, Jensen H. 2008. Sanitation and Hygiene Deficiencies as Contributing Factors in Contamination of Imported Foods, p 139-158. In Doyle M, Erickson M (ed), Imported Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815745.ch5

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error