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Chapter 9 : Summary and Perspective of the Impact of Imported Foods on the Microbiological Safety of the United States’ Food Supply

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Summary and Perspective of the Impact of Imported Foods on the Microbiological Safety of the United States’ Food Supply, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Demand-side drivers are critical factors influencing the increased demand for imported food. Support for the effectiveness of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) programs for monitoring the safety of imported foods is suggested from the relatively low number of reported outbreaks/illnesses attributed to this segment of foods. Several studies have been conducted to identify the microbiological safety of foods in developing countries by assaying different food products for harmful microorganisms and their toxins. Food groups that had the greatest number of microbiologically associated refusals at the U.S. border in 2007 are listed in this chapter. The spectrum where the least amount of control over safety of imported foods occurs, the private enterprise selects their supplier but must monitor the safety of the incoming ingredients or product on a routine basis. Food imported into the United States is increasing at an unprecedented rate, especially for horticultural products. The current emphasis on conversion of corn and other crops into ethanol for use as biofuels is likely to stimulate greater importation of foods. Many imported foods are produced in developing countries under conditions that can result in contamination by microbial pathogens. The government’s role in ensuring the safety of imported foods is to verify the food industry is producing safe foods.

Citation: Erickson M, Doyle M. 2008. Summary and Perspective of the Impact of Imported Foods on the Microbiological Safety of the United States’ Food Supply, p 255-266. In Doyle M, Erickson M (ed), Imported Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815745.ch9

Key Concept Ranking

Milk and Milk Products
0.59145963
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
0.53716993
Food Safety
0.5230061
Good Agricultural Practices
0.45010656
Fruits and Vegetables
0.40655074
0.59145963
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References

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Tables

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Table 1

FDA import refusals by violation code in 2007

Citation: Erickson M, Doyle M. 2008. Summary and Perspective of the Impact of Imported Foods on the Microbiological Safety of the United States’ Food Supply, p 255-266. In Doyle M, Erickson M (ed), Imported Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815745.ch9
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Table 2

Microbiological violation codes associated with seafood refusals in 2001 and 2007

Citation: Erickson M, Doyle M. 2008. Summary and Perspective of the Impact of Imported Foods on the Microbiological Safety of the United States’ Food Supply, p 255-266. In Doyle M, Erickson M (ed), Imported Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815745.ch9
Generic image for table
Table 3

Top five food groups by rank of number of import refusals associated with microbiological issues in 2007

Citation: Erickson M, Doyle M. 2008. Summary and Perspective of the Impact of Imported Foods on the Microbiological Safety of the United States’ Food Supply, p 255-266. In Doyle M, Erickson M (ed), Imported Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815745.ch9
Generic image for table
Table 4

Top five countries by rank of number of import refusals associated with microbiological issues in 2007

Citation: Erickson M, Doyle M. 2008. Summary and Perspective of the Impact of Imported Foods on the Microbiological Safety of the United States’ Food Supply, p 255-266. In Doyle M, Erickson M (ed), Imported Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815745.ch9

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