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Chapter 21 : Dynamics of the CD8 T-Cell Response Revealed by Infection

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Dynamics of the CD8 T-Cell Response Revealed by Infection, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter discusses the recent advances in understanding of the dynamics of the CD8 T-cell response as revealed by murine infection with . A number of studies suggest that the magnitude of expansion of the CD8 T-cell population after infection depends on the dose of the infecting pathogen. The expansion phase of the CD8 T-cell response after infection occurs in an environment of substantial inflammation. The peak of the CD8 T-cell response occurs approximately 1 week after infection, but the timing of the peak number of antigen specific CD8 T cells can vary by several days depending on the infection model system evaluated. The factors that determine the timing of peak expansion in antigen-specific CD8 T-cell numbers in these different systems are unknown. The expansion in antigen-specific CD8 T-cell numbers is followed by an abrupt transition, during which the number of these cells begins to decrease in all tissues of the host. Recent studies with the model system have begun to shed light on the nature of the input signals that program CD8 T-cell contraction. The infection of mice with evokes a defined, robust CD8 T-cell response that can be tracked and analyzed using modern immunological methodology. This host-pathogen interaction has provided important information in the understanding of all phases of the CD8 T-cell response, from initiation to expansion, contraction, and memory generation.

Citation: Harty J. 2007. Dynamics of the CD8 T-Cell Response Revealed by Infection, p 315-323. In Brogden K, Minion F, Cornick N, Stanton T, Zhang Q, Nolan L, Wannemuehler M (ed), Virulence Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogens, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815851.ch21

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Innate Immune System
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Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus
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Major Histocompatibility Complex
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FIGURE 1

Progression from naïve to memory CD8 T cells after acute infection or vaccination. Upon infection or vaccination, the recognition of antigenic peptides presented by mature dendritic cells (DC) by naïve CD8 T cells triggers CD8 T-cell-population expansion and differentiation of the cells into effector CD8 T cells. Five to 10% of CD8 T cells detected at the peak of expansion survive the contraction (death) phase to initiate the memory pool, which can remain stable in cell number for life. LOD, limit of detection; Ag, antigen. Reprinted from ( ) with permission from the publisher.

Citation: Harty J. 2007. Dynamics of the CD8 T-Cell Response Revealed by Infection, p 315-323. In Brogden K, Minion F, Cornick N, Stanton T, Zhang Q, Nolan L, Wannemuehler M (ed), Virulence Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogens, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815851.ch21
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References

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