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Chapter 10 : Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted Primarily by the Airborne Route

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Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted Primarily by the Airborne Route, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter focuses on certain organisms for which the airborne route is the predominant means of transmission to humans. The in vivo tissue forms of the fungi are yeasts or spherules and are not readily transmissible to other humans, either by direct contact or by the airborne route. Efficient means of production of droplet nuclei in nature are sneezing, coughing, and vibration of the larynx, all of which introduce energy that subdivides fluids into tiny droplets. Qualitative risk assessment is encompassed in the biosafety levels (BSLs) established in Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories. The current laboratory safety-oriented biosafety classification of microorganisms reflects what is known regarding the tendency for an organism to be transmitted by an airborne route, if there is effective treatment available for infection, and whether a vaccine is available. must be inhaled deep into the lung and reach the alveoli as the first step in a successful infection of a new host. Hazard assessment in the laboratory should focus critical attention on the manipulation of fluids. All opening of tubes, pipetting, transfers, sonication, vortex mixing, etc., should be carefully contained. Many bacteria that have caused laboratory acquired infections in humans include , , and . The greatest problem encountered in the laboratory safety arena is generally not those involving decision patterns for known problems. Rather, it is more often the unknown safety precautions required for a particular agent that causes the laboratorian to fear infection.

Citation: Pentella M, Kostle P, Desjardin L, Gilchrist M. 2006. Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted Primarily by the Airborne Route, p 209-220. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch10

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Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus
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Simian immunodeficiency virus
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Hepatitis B virus
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References

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Tables

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TABLE 1

Airborne pathogen containment for work with agents usually handled at BSL-2 in diagnostic quantities

Citation: Pentella M, Kostle P, Desjardin L, Gilchrist M. 2006. Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted Primarily by the Airborne Route, p 209-220. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch10
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TABLE 2

Evaporation time and falling distance of droplets based on size

Citation: Pentella M, Kostle P, Desjardin L, Gilchrist M. 2006. Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted Primarily by the Airborne Route, p 209-220. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch10
Generic image for table
TABLE 3

Stratification of tasks according to risk of aerosol spread of tuberculosis

Citation: Pentella M, Kostle P, Desjardin L, Gilchrist M. 2006. Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted Primarily by the Airborne Route, p 209-220. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch10

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