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Chapter 15 : Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards

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Abstract:

Primary barriers range from a basic laboratory coat to a biological safety cabinet (BSC). This chapter addresses some of the more common primary containment devices and personal protective equipment and a variety of equipment-associated hazards. The history of laboratory-acquired illnesses amply demonstrates how important primary barriers are and how equally important it is to select appropriate primary barriers and use them correctly. Personal protective equipment includes all clothing and other work accessories designed to serve or be worn as a barrier against workplace hazards. Employers and employees must be conscious of the fact that personal protective equipment alone does not eliminate the hazard. If the primary containment fails or is insufficient, personal protective equipment often becomes an important barrier against exposure. This chapter illustrates the four biosafety levels (BSLs) and their corresponding primary barriers. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards outline the specific provisions for the various types of personal protective equipment. The choice of style and fabric should be based on the job tasks to be performed, and the material or hazards to which the wearer may be exposed. The selection and use of the appropriate primary barriers constitute just one important component of the overall laboratory safety program. Laboratory-acquired infections have occurred due to the lack of or misuse of primary containment devices and personal protective equipment. Personal protective equipment should be chosen carefully and utilized appropriately.

Citation: Gilman Duane E, Fink R. 2006. Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards, p 295-301. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch15

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

92140AR Super Mouse 750 Micro-Isolator high-density animal housing system equipped with Enviro-Gard environmental control supply and exhaust air units. (Courtesy of Lab Products, Inc.)

Citation: Gilman Duane E, Fink R. 2006. Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards, p 295-301. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch15
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Ultracentrifuge rotor after the rotor exploded. (Courtesy of MIT Biosafety Office.)

Citation: Gilman Duane E, Fink R. 2006. Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards, p 295-301. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch15
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Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

Pieces of an ultracentrifuge rotor after the rotor exploded. (Courtesy of MIT Biosafety Office.)

Citation: Gilman Duane E, Fink R. 2006. Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards, p 295-301. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch15
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References

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Tables

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TABLE 1

BSLs and corresponding primary barriers

Citation: Gilman Duane E, Fink R. 2006. Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards, p 295-301. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch15

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