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Chapter 23 : Biosafety Compliance: a Global Perspective

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Abstract:

This chapter provides an overview of the regulations and guidelines for handling biohazards and recombinant DNA (rDNA) in workplaces around the world. The Genetic Manipulation Advisory Committee (GMAC) oversees the development and use of innovative genetic manipulation techniques in Australia so that risks to the safety of workers or potential hazards to the community or environment associated with the genetics of manipulated organisms are identified and can be managed. Most biosafety issues are addressed at the provincial level under transportation of dangerous goods legislation, occupational health and safety legislation, general public health and safety legislation, and federal and provincial Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) legislation. A bill must be passed by both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate before it becomes a Public Law. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has developed regulations for the safe transport of dangerous goods by air. These regulations have been incorporated by the International Air Transport Association’s (IATA) into a set of internationally accepted regulations which cover the packaging and transportation of dangerous goods (including infectious materials) internationally.

Citation: Rebar R, Moriyama H. 2006. Biosafety Compliance: a Global Perspective, p 417-436. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch23

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References

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