1887

Chapter 29 : Biosafety in the Teaching Laboratory

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Biosafety in the Teaching Laboratory, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555815899/9781555813390_Chap29-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555815899/9781555813390_Chap29-2.gif

Abstract:

As a general rule, teaching laboratories tend to be densely populated with large numbers of individuals with limited experience in the hazards of a science laboratory. A section of this chapter focuses on college and university microbiology teaching laboratories where hazardous organisms are handled. Numerous common procedures conducted in the microbiology teaching laboratory may create aerosols, including improper sterilization of inoculating loops, centrifugation and microcentrifugation, use of bead beaters or shearing blenders, pipetting, and handling of contaminated animal bedding. Each biosafety level (BSL) is based on the accepted potential hazard of the agent, as well as the general operations of the laboratory. Increasing attention has been focused on the potential for microbiology teaching laboratories to be exploited by terrorists as a means of acquiring agents or knowledge to conduct acts of bioterrorism. While animal and plant pathogens may represent potential threats for misuse as bioterrorism agents, at the same time many of these organisms are invaluable tools in the microbiology teaching laboratory. The selection of appropriate microorganisms and their toxins for instructional purposes in the microbiology teaching laboratory is integral to creating a biologically safe learning environment. The strategic choice of organisms and toxins suited to introductory, intermediate, or advanced course levels complements instructor efforts to increase student awareness of potential biosafety risks, and educates students in good microbiological laboratory practice to minimize those risks. By making safety training a part of every microbiology laboratory, and by providing careful counseling, risks such as exposure to biohazardous microorganisms can be minimized.

Citation: Carlberg D, Yeaman M. 2006. Biosafety in the Teaching Laboratory, p 531-549. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch29

Key Concept Ranking

Hepatitis B virus
0.4424067
Yellow fever virus
0.44192415
Food Microbiology
0.43489242
Microbial Ecology
0.43489242
0.4424067
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Laboratory benches arranged parallel to the front of the room allow students to face the instructor comfortably.

Citation: Carlberg D, Yeaman M. 2006. Biosafety in the Teaching Laboratory, p 531-549. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch29
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Parallel benches are usually of limited depth because of floor space restrictions.

Citation: Carlberg D, Yeaman M. 2006. Biosafety in the Teaching Laboratory, p 531-549. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch29
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

Perpendicular benches offer more usable space, but some students must sit sidesaddle to face the instructor.

Citation: Carlberg D, Yeaman M. 2006. Biosafety in the Teaching Laboratory, p 531-549. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch29
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4

Benches positioned too close together and student stations placed opposite one another can result in collisions and spills.

Citation: Carlberg D, Yeaman M. 2006. Biosafety in the Teaching Laboratory, p 531-549. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch29
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555815899.ch29
1. Baumberg, A., and, R. Freeman. 1971. Salmonella typhimurium LT-2 is still pathogenic for man. J. Gen. Microbiol. 65:99100.
2. Benson, H. J. 2001. Microbiological Applications. Laboratory Manual in General Microbiology, 8th ed. WCB McGraw-Hill, Boston, Mass.
3. Boyer, B., K. J. Debenedictis,, R. Master, and, R. S. Jones. 1998. The microbiology “unknown” misadventure. Am. J. Infect. Control. 26:355358.
4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2002. Guideline for hand hygiene in health-care settings. Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 51(RR-16):144.
5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2005. Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and Toxins. 42 CFR Parts 72 and 73. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Fed. Regist. 70:1329313325.
6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Institutes of Health. 1999. Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, 4th ed. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.
7. Collins, C. H., and, D. A. Kennedy. 1999. Laboratory-Acquired Infections, 4th ed. Butterworth Heinman, London, England.
8. Comerio, M. C. 2003. Seismic protection of laboratory contents: the UC Berkeley science building case study. [On line.] http://www-iurd.ced.berkeley.edu/pub/abstract_WP200302.htm.
9. Dixon, B. 1998. E. coli ’s double life. ASM News 64:616617.
10. Furr, A. K. 2000. CRC Handbook of Laboratory Safety, 5th ed., p. 603–667. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Fla.
11. Gerloff, G. C.,, G. P. Fitzgerald, and, F. Skoog. 1950. The isolation, purification and culture of blue-green algae. Am. J. Bot. 37:216218.
12. Jagger, J. 1967. Introduction to Research in Ultraviolet Photobiology. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, N.J.
13. Jagger, J. 1985. Solar-UV Actions on Living Cells. Praeger Publishers, New York, N.Y.
14. Larson, E. 1999. Skin hygiene and infection prevention: more of the same or different approaches? Clin. Infect. Dis. 29:12871294.
15. Lindell, M. K., and, R. W. Perry. 1996. Addressing gaps in environmental emergency planning: hazardous materials releases during earthquakes. J. Environ. Planning Manag. 39:529545.
16. Lindler, L. E., F. J. Lebeda, and, G. W. Korch (ed.). 2005. Biological Weapons Defense. Infectious Diseases and Counterterrorism. Humana Press, Totowa, N.J.
17. Maloy, S.,, J. E. Cronan, and, D. Freifelder. 1994. Microbial Genetics, 2nd ed. Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Boston, Mass.
18. Mueller, L.,, P. Kasper,, B. Kersten, and, J. Zhang. 1998. Photochemical genotoxicity and photochemical carcinogenesis—two sides of a coin? Toxicol. Lett. 102–103:382387.
19. Pal, S. B. (ed.). 1985. Handbook of Laboratory Health and Safety Measures. MTP Press, Boston, Mass.
20. Phillips, G. B. 1965. XIII. Microbiological hazards in the laboratory—part two—prevention. J. Chem. Educ. 42:A117–A120, A122, A124, A126, A128, A130.
21. Pike, R. M. 1976. Laboratory-associated infections: summary and analysis of 3921 cases. Health Lab. Sci. 13:105114.
22. Pike, R. M. 1979. Laboratory-associated infections: incidence, fatalities, causes and prevention. Annu. Rev. Microbiol. 33:4166.
23. Rice,, E. W.,, M. J. Allen,, D. J. Brenner, and, S. C. Edberg. 1991. Assay for beta-glucuronidase in species of the genus Escherichia and its applications for drinking-water analysis. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:592593.
24. Smibert, R. M., and, N. R. Krieg. 1994. Phenotypic characteristics, p. 607–654. In P. Gerhardt (ed.), Methods for General and Molecular Bacteriology. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, D.C.
25. Widmer, A. F. 2000. Replace hand washing with use of waterless alcohol hand rub? Clin. Infect. Dis. 31:136143.
26. World Health Organization. 2004. Laboratory Biosafety Manual, 3rd ed. World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
27. Young, S., L. Balluz, and, J. Malilay. 2004. Natural and technologic hazardous material releases during and after natural disasters: a review. Sci. Total Environ. 322:320.

Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

Example of a listing to aid instructors in choosing bacteria for classroom use

Citation: Carlberg D, Yeaman M. 2006. Biosafety in the Teaching Laboratory, p 531-549. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch29
Generic image for table

APPENDIX B. SAMPLE STUDENT SAFETY VERIFICATION FORM

Citation: Carlberg D, Yeaman M. 2006. Biosafety in the Teaching Laboratory, p 531-549. In Fleming D, Hunt D (ed), Biological Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815899.ch29

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error