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Chapter 30 : Helminths Acquired from Finfish, Shellfish, and Other Food Sources

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Abstract:

A variety of human helminthic infections can be acquired through the consumption of food products from infected animals and plants, through the accidental ingestion of infected invertebrates in foodstuffs or drinking water, or through inadvertent fecal contamination by humans or animals. Prevention of biohelminth infections can be accomplished by avoiding the intermediate hosts or by adequately cooking foods. In contrast, helminths with eggs or free-living stages that can survive a certain length of time in the external environment, termed geohelminths, are typically transmitted via contaminated water or foods and are best controlled by improved sanitation. Several related nematodes of the genera , , and may be acquired by eating raw fish or squid in seafood dishes such as sushi, sashimi, seviche, and lomi-lomi. Infection may also be acquired from shellfish juices used in food dishes or folk remedies, from food prepared by using contaminated utensils or chopping blocks, or from drinking water contaminated with metacercariae released from dead or injured crustaceans. Raw foods, particularly fish and chicken, should be avoided in areas where infection is endemic, and drinking water should be filtered before consumption. Human infection with is explained by the accidental ingestion of ants on vegetation, and is thought to be acquired by eating raw fruits and vegetables on which snails have left larvae in mucus deposits or by accidentally ingesting infected snails on unwashed vegetation. Preventive measures include protection of grains and foodstuffs from insects and rodent control.

Citation: Hayunga E. 2007. Helminths Acquired from Finfish, Shellfish, and Other Food Sources, p 649-662. In Doyle M, Beuchat L (ed), Food Microbiology: Fundamentals and Frontiers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815912.ch30

Key Concept Ranking

Parasitic Diseases
0.5206008
Fruits and Vegetables
0.43347543
Paragonimus westermani
0.413955
Trichinella spiralis
0.41087735
0.5206008
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Figures

Image of Figure 30.1
Figure 30.1

embedded in the human gastric mucosa as visualized by gastroscopy. (Photograph contributed by Tomoo Oshima; illustration courtesy of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C., AFIP 76-2118.)

Citation: Hayunga E. 2007. Helminths Acquired from Finfish, Shellfish, and Other Food Sources, p 649-662. In Doyle M, Beuchat L (ed), Food Microbiology: Fundamentals and Frontiers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815912.ch30
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Image of Figure 30.2
Figure 30.2

Transverse section of larval embedded in human intestinal glands. Magnification, ×95. (Illustration courtesy of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, AFIP 69-1066.)

Citation: Hayunga E. 2007. Helminths Acquired from Finfish, Shellfish, and Other Food Sources, p 649-662. In Doyle M, Beuchat L (ed), Food Microbiology: Fundamentals and Frontiers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815912.ch30
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Image of Figure 30.3
Figure 30.3

Arrows show larvae within the body cavity of the intermediate host, . Magnification, ×60. (Specimen contributed by E. L. Schiller, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, Md.; illustration courtesy of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, AFIP 68-4629.)

Citation: Hayunga E. 2007. Helminths Acquired from Finfish, Shellfish, and Other Food Sources, p 649-662. In Doyle M, Beuchat L (ed), Food Microbiology: Fundamentals and Frontiers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815912.ch30
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Image of Figure 30.4
Figure 30.4

A sparganum removed from a subcutaneous nodule in the inguinal region. Magnification, ×1.7. (Illustration courtesy of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, AFIP 70-7392.)

Citation: Hayunga E. 2007. Helminths Acquired from Finfish, Shellfish, and Other Food Sources, p 649-662. In Doyle M, Beuchat L (ed), Food Microbiology: Fundamentals and Frontiers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815912.ch30
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Image of Figure 30.5
Figure 30.5

Numerous adult worms obstructing the jejunum of a 13-year-old Zairian. Magnification, ×2.5. (Illustration courtesy of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, AFIP 72-13204.)

Citation: Hayunga E. 2007. Helminths Acquired from Finfish, Shellfish, and Other Food Sources, p 649-662. In Doyle M, Beuchat L (ed), Food Microbiology: Fundamentals and Frontiers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815912.ch30
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Image of Figure 30.6
Figure 30.6

adult worms. The photograph shows the slender anterior ends threaded beneath the colonic epithelium. Magnification, ×3.7. (Illustration courtesy of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, AFIP 69-3583.)

Citation: Hayunga E. 2007. Helminths Acquired from Finfish, Shellfish, and Other Food Sources, p 649-662. In Doyle M, Beuchat L (ed), Food Microbiology: Fundamentals and Frontiers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815912.ch30
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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 30.1

Sources of infection with some foodborne helminths of humans

Citation: Hayunga E. 2007. Helminths Acquired from Finfish, Shellfish, and Other Food Sources, p 649-662. In Doyle M, Beuchat L (ed), Food Microbiology: Fundamentals and Frontiers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815912.ch30

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