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Chapter 36 : Mupirocin

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Mupirocin, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Mupirocin is active against gram-positive cocci: it has moderate activity against gram-positive bacilli such as and ; it is inactive against corynebacteria and . It is inactive against spp. It is active against , whether the strains are susceptible or resistant to penicillin G, tetracyclines, erythromycin A, fusidic acid, lincomycin, chloramphenicol, or methicillin. Mupirocin has good activity against human and animal mycoplasmas. As mupirocin is highly serum protein bound, the in vitro activity is reduced in the presence of human serum. Mupirocin alters protein synthesis by blocking the incorporation of isoleucine into the peptide during synthesis. Since 1985, when mupirocin was introduced into clinical practice, two types of resistant strains have been described: those for which the MICs are between 8 and 256 µg/ml and those for which the MICs are 512 µg/ml. Extensive use of mupirocin has resulted in the emergence of resistant strains of in the United Kingdom. Local application of mupirocin yields in situ concentrations of 20,000 mg/kg. Skin and skin structure infections are very common, but the use of topical antibiotics or other antibacterial agents is limited by a number of factors: the complexity of the anatomy of the skin, the bacterial ecology of the skin, and the nature of the microorganisms involved in these infections. Mupirocin eradicates methicillin-resistant strains of colonizing the skin and produces an improvement in the healing of skin wounds.

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36

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Figures

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Figure 1

Mupirocin (pseudomonic acid A)

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
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Figure 2

Pseudomonic acids B, C, and D

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
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Figure 3

Bactericidal activity of mupirocin against

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
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Figure 4

Mechanism of action of mupirocin

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
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Figure 5

Metabolism of mupirocin

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
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Figure 6

Modifications of pseudomonic acid A

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
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References

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Tables

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Table 1

Physicochemical properties of pseudomonic acids

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
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Table 2

Activity of mupirocin against gram-positive bacteria

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
Generic image for table
Table 3

Activity of mupirocin against gram-negative bacteria

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
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Table 4

Activity of mupirocin against streptococci

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
Generic image for table
Table 5

Activity of mupirocin against mycoplasmas

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
Generic image for table
Table 6

Effect of pH on antibacterial activity of mupirocin

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
Generic image for table
Table 7

In vitro activity in the presence of serum

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36
Generic image for table
Table 8

Pharmacokinetics of mupirocin intravenously

Citation: Bryskier A. 2005. Mupirocin, p 964-971. In Bryskier, M.D. A (ed), Antimicrobial Agents. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815929.ch36

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