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Chapter 30 : Food Safety Management Systems

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Food Safety Management Systems, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Food safety management can be viewed from different levels: broadly from the perspective of government food safety management systems or more narrowly from that of industry-wide food safety management systems or that of food safety management within an individual establishment. The role of the food industry is to provide safe foods; industry is responsible for establishing food safety management systems that ensure that foods present a minimal risk to the consumer. Risk analysis allows the development of risk-based metrics, such as food safety objectives (FSOs), performance objectives (POs), and performance criteria (PCs), which are addressed in this chapter. Seven hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) principles form the framework of a systematic approach to ensure the determination and control of significant food safety hazards associated with a product and process. Monitoring is the first line of defense in the preventive HACCP system. In addition to those related to GMP or sanitation regulations, prerequisite programs can include other programs, such as ingredient specifications, consumer complaint management, glass control programs, allergen management programs, microbiological monitoring of the plant environment, ingredient-to-product traceability programs, and supplier approval programs. PCs can easily be translated into product or process criteria by industry or by government. In integrating a farm-to-fork food safety system, there will be a variety of metrics at points along the food chain.

Citation: Scott V, Chen Y. 2010. Food Safety Management Systems, p 478-492. In Juneja V, Sofos J (ed), Pathogens and Toxins in Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815936.ch30

Key Concept Ranking

Food Safety Agencies
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Food Safety
0.4597913
Good Agricultural Practices
0.4082431
Quantitative Risk Assessment
0.40299022
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References

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Tables

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Table 1.

Elements of a government food safety management system and elements for which industry has a responsibility

Citation: Scott V, Chen Y. 2010. Food Safety Management Systems, p 478-492. In Juneja V, Sofos J (ed), Pathogens and Toxins in Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815936.ch30
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Table 2.

Application of the two-stage approach to conduct hazard analysis

Citation: Scott V, Chen Y. 2010. Food Safety Management Systems, p 478-492. In Juneja V, Sofos J (ed), Pathogens and Toxins in Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815936.ch30
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Table 3.

HACCP plan summary—frozen breaded fish sticks (example)

Citation: Scott V, Chen Y. 2010. Food Safety Management Systems, p 478-492. In Juneja V, Sofos J (ed), Pathogens and Toxins in Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815936.ch30
Generic image for table
Table 4.

Food safety metrics

Citation: Scott V, Chen Y. 2010. Food Safety Management Systems, p 478-492. In Juneja V, Sofos J (ed), Pathogens and Toxins in Foods. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815936.ch30

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