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Chapter 6 : Commonly Asked Questions about Diagnostic Parasitology

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Commonly Asked Questions about Diagnostic Parasitology, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This section focuses on diagnostic parasitology. Specimen collection and processing procedures constitute the ova and parasite examination (O&P exam). The direct wet smear, concentration, and permanent stained smear constitute the routine O&P exam on fresh stool specimens. The section provides some of the immunoassay options available for stool protozoa. Currently, immunoassays are available for , spp., the / group, and . Most effective techniques for the identification of the intestinal protozoa, the wet preparation smear and the permanent stained smear are recommended as the most relevant and accurate procedures for identification. Some helminth eggs are quite heavy and will not float, even when zinc sulfate with a specific gravity of 1.20 is used. The scientific (genus and species) names should be used on the final report that goes to the physician and on the patient’s chart. It is also recommended that the stage of the organism be included (trophozoite, cyst, oocyst, spore, egg, larvae, adult worm); various stages of the malaria parasites affect the outcome of therapy.

Citation: Garcia L. 2009. Commonly Asked Questions about Diagnostic Parasitology, p 219-254. In Practical Guide to Diagnostic Parasitology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815967.ch6

Key Concept Ranking

Parasitic Diseases
0.8380367
Chemicals
0.5540377
Plasmodium falciparum
0.4971752
Plasmodium vivax
0.4915254
0.8380367
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Figures

Image of Figure 6.1
Figure 6.1

The traditional method for preparing a thin blood film; the blood can be either “pushed” or “pulled” by the spreader slide. (Illustration by Sharon Belkin.)

Citation: Garcia L. 2009. Commonly Asked Questions about Diagnostic Parasitology, p 219-254. In Practical Guide to Diagnostic Parasitology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815967.ch6
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Image of Figure 6.2
Figure 6.2

Poorly prepared thin and thick blood films (dirty slides, oil on slides, excessively thick preparations, poor spreading of the blood); organism morphology is very poor on the stained films.

Citation: Garcia L. 2009. Commonly Asked Questions about Diagnostic Parasitology, p 219-254. In Practical Guide to Diagnostic Parasitology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815967.ch6
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Image of Figure 6.3
Figure 6.3

Method of thick-thin combination blood film preparation. (a) Position of the drop of EDTA-containing blood. (b) Position of the applicator stick in contact with blood and the glass slide. (c) Rotation of the applicator stick. (d) Completed thick-thin combination blood film prior to staining. (Illustration by Sharon Belkin.)

Citation: Garcia L. 2009. Commonly Asked Questions about Diagnostic Parasitology, p 219-254. In Practical Guide to Diagnostic Parasitology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815967.ch6
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Image of Figure 6.4
Figure 6.4

Rapid malaria test. (Top) The negative test shows the control line only; (middle) the control line plus the line indicates the presence of a panspecific antigen (common to all spp., but more sensitive for than for and ); (bottom) the control line, panspecific antigen line, and line specific for antigen.

Citation: Garcia L. 2009. Commonly Asked Questions about Diagnostic Parasitology, p 219-254. In Practical Guide to Diagnostic Parasitology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815967.ch6
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Download as Powerpoint

References

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1. Garcia, L. S. 2007. Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, 5th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
2. Garcia, L. S. (coordinating ed.). 2008. Laboratory Procedures for Diagnosis of Blood-Borne Parasitic Diseases. Cumitech 46. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
3. Hanson, K. L.,, and C.P. Cartwright. 2001. Use of an enzyme immunoassay does not eliminate the need to analyze multiple stool specimens for sensitive detection of Giardia lamblia. J. Clin. Microbiol. 39: 474477.
4. Isenberg, H. D. (ed.). 2004. Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 2nd ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC. Parasitology section in vol. 2 of 3 volumes.
5. NCCLS/CLSI. 2000. Use of Blood Film Examination for Parasites. Approved guideline M15-A. NCCLS/CLSI, Wayne, PA.
6. NCCLS/CLSI. 1997. Procedures for the Recovery and Identification of Parasites from the Intestinal Tract, 2nd ed. Approved guideline M28-A. NCCLS/CLSI, Wayne, PA.

Tables

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Citation: Garcia L. 2009. Commonly Asked Questions about Diagnostic Parasitology, p 219-254. In Practical Guide to Diagnostic Parasitology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815967.ch6
Generic image for table
Untitled

Citation: Garcia L. 2009. Commonly Asked Questions about Diagnostic Parasitology, p 219-254. In Practical Guide to Diagnostic Parasitology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815967.ch6
Generic image for table
Untitled

Citation: Garcia L. 2009. Commonly Asked Questions about Diagnostic Parasitology, p 219-254. In Practical Guide to Diagnostic Parasitology, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555815967.ch6

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