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Chapter 21 : Transduction

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Transduction, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

In the process of transduction, a bacterial virus (bacteriophage) carries bacterial genes from one cell to another. Many different bacteriophages are capable of transduction; the details of transduction by any one of them depend on its life cycle. Cellular enzymes are diverted to make many new copies of the viral genetic material and many viral proteins. The viral DNA lies dormant in the host chromosome until a signal directs it to begin an active (often lytic) infection cycle. There are variations on the lytic and latent infection themes. Virus particles that contain bacterial DNA instead of viral DNA are completely capable of attaching to a new host cell and injecting DNA (those functions are carried out by the protein capsid and are independent of its contents). The usually fatal food poisoning botulism is a phage-borne disease. food poisoning is associated with a bacterial virus. The most common toxin involved in this disease is encoded by a gene on a lysogenic phage. The disease diphtheria is caused by the bacterium . Cholera is also associated with transduction. The most severe symptoms of cholera are caused by a single protein, the cholera toxin. The chapter talks about amber mutations and amber suppressors.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Transduction, p 319-328. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch21

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Figure 21.1

Transduction of plasmid DNA by bacteriophage T4.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Transduction, p 319-328. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch21
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References

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1. Micklos, D.,, and G. Freyer. 1990. DNA Science: a First Course in Recombinant DNA TechnologyCold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, NY. This very readable (though now aging) text tells the story of the development of molecular biology, explaining the science along the way. It covers all the major techniques of DNA science plus a variety of applications. The book could be used as a text for a molecular biology course for high-achieving high school seniors or for college or community college students. It also makes an easy-to-read reference book for teachers.
2. Miller, R.1998. Bacterial gene swapping in nature. Scientific American278(1):67.

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