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Chapter 22 : Gene Transfer in Plants by

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Gene Transfer in Plants by , Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

In this student activity, students inoculate plants with the bacterium and observe the subsequent plant tumor formation. The common soil bacterium causes crown gall disease in many dicotyledonous plants. Virulent strains of contain genes that cause the plant cells to divide. The plasmid used by is the tumor-inducing, or Ti, plasmid. Chemicals secreted from freshly wounded plant tissue attract to the wound site. The injected bacterial DNA diverts the plant cell's machinery to tasks that support the growth and reproduction of . The strain-specific opine also promotes the conjugational transfer of tumor-inducing plasmids from that virulent strain to avirulent (plasmid-free) strains of . The gall induced by is located at soil level where the roots join the stem (the crown). The genes that control gene transfer ability remain intact. Once individual plant cells have received new genetic information, the problem becomes how to regenerate whole plants from these cells. is an effective vector for tobacco, petunias, tomatoes, and other dicots—plants with two seed leaves. Microinjection is a new twist on an old idea. Biologists first used fine glass microtools in the late 1800s to dissect animal tissues. Using electroporation, scientists shock protoplasts with electricity until they become receptive to foreign DNA.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Gene Transfer in Plants by , p 329-334. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch22

Key Concept Ranking

Crown Gall Disease
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Figures

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Figure 22.1

Transfer of T-DNA to a plant cell.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Gene Transfer in Plants by , p 329-334. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch22
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References

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1. Chilton, Mary-Dell. 1983. A vector for introducing new genes into plants. Scientific American 48(6):5059.
2. Ronald, P. 1997. Making rice disease-resistant. Scientific American 277(5):100.

Tables

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Plant Observation Log

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Gene Transfer in Plants by , p 329-334. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch22

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