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Chapter 28 : Forensic DNA Typing

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Forensic DNA Typing, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter contains three easy activities that illustrate applications of DNA typing plus a reading about applications of DNA analysis to human remains found at an archaeological site. The original reference for the archaeology case is listed. In Exercise 1, students assign babies to the correct pair of parents based on DNA profiles. In Exercise 2, students analyze DNA typing data to determine if I. M. Megabucks, a recently deceased megabillionaire, is actually the father of any of three children alleged to be his heirs. This activity can be done, with some discussion, by students who have completed . Students should also have completed (the introduction to restriction enzymes) and (the introduction to electrophoresis) before doing this activity. DNA-based identification methods focus on highly variable regions of the human genome. To conduct DNA typing, the students must have a DNA containing sample. In paternity cases, blood is drawn from the child, its mother, and the alleged father, and DNA is extracted from the white cells. The first DNA-typing methods used Southern hybridization; now, PCR-based approaches are increasingly popular. It is not possible to say that no small ethnic group anywhere has a special, common DNA-typing profile not often seen in any other population—not unless everyone everywhere has been typed. In about one out of three cases, the perpetrator was unknown to the victim.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Forensic DNA Typing, p 401-414. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch28

Key Concept Ranking

Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism
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Figures

Image of Figure 28.1
Figure 28.1

DNA profile data from the Smith, Stevenson, and Jones parents and the three infants.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Forensic DNA Typing, p 401-414. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch28
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Image of Figure 28.2
Figure 28.2

Results of hybridization analysis.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Forensic DNA Typing, p 401-414. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch28
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Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 28.3
Figure 28.3

Results of PCR analysis.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Forensic DNA Typing, p 401-414. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch28
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

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1. Cappellini, E., et al. 2004. Biomolecular study of the human remains from tomb 5859 in the Etruscan necropolis of Monterozzi, Tarquinia (Viterbo, Italy). Journal of Archaeological Science 31:603612.
2. Jeffreys, A. 2005. Genetic fingerprinting. Nature Medicine 11(10):xivxviii. The scientist credited with inventing the concept of DNA typing recounts the development of the technology.
3. Menotti-Raymond, M., et al. 1997. Pet cat hair implicates murder suspect. Nature 386:774. The story of the forensic case of Snowball the cat.
4. Yoon, C. K. 1993. Forensic science. Botanical witness for the prosecution. Science 268:894895. The story of the use of the DNA profile of an individual Palo Verde tree to link a suspect to a murder scene.

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