1887

Chapter 39 : Bioethics Case Study: Genetic Testing

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $30.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Bioethics Case Study: Genetic Testing, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555816100/9781555814717_Chap39-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555816100/9781555814717_Chap39-2.gif

Abstract:

In this chapter, students are asked to use the decision-making model to analyze ethical dilemmas related to newer capacities to test for genetic defects. Before the students tackle ethical dilemmas posed by genetic testing, you should provide information that allows them to place ethical issues associated with genetic testing in context. A first step to informed discussion of genetic testing is establishing a semantic distinction between genetic testing, gene (or genetic marker) identification, and genetic screening. For purposes of this chapter's discussion, genetic testing is referred to a diagnostic test, usually ordered by a physician, to test for a specific genetic disorder because the physician thinks there is a good chance the person might have the defective gene. With the older testing technologies, in order to diagnose a genetic disease, physicians had to have a measurable or observable phenotype that was consistently associated with the genetic defect. Now, however, with only partial DNA sequences of disease genes or nearby marker sequences, physicians can diagnose genetic diseases long before symptoms appear. A table illustrates legally mandated neonatal screening for genetic disorders. The chapter presents two case studies for application of the model. To follow the methodology outlined in the model, students must have a basic knowledge of cystic fibrosis (CF), including its genetic basis, symptoms, and treatments and the prognosis for patients who suffer from the disease.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Bioethics Case Study: Genetic Testing, p 569-584. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch39

Key Concept Ranking

Colon Cancer
0.5192308
Cystic Fibrosis
0.5168814
Multiple Sclerosis
0.4631231
Burkitt Lymphoma
0.46106923
Petri Dish
0.457334
Genetic Variation
0.44145122
0.5192308
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 39.1
Figure 39.1

Progress in disease diagnosis. A disease process begins with molecular and cellular changes, moves through a series of stages, and, in the later and most severe stages, becomes manifested as visible clinical symptoms. Technological advances in the20th century made it possible to diagnose diseases earlier, before the patient showed clinical signs of having the disease. Technological advances in the coming century will make it possible to identify diseases at increasingly earlier stages. In certain cases, the diagnosis may occur before the disease process has begun, which increases the prospect of disease prevention.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Bioethics Case Study: Genetic Testing, p 569-584. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch39
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555816100.chap39a

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 39.1

Legally mandated neonatal screening for genetic disorders

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Bioethics Case Study: Genetic Testing, p 569-584. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch39

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error