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Chapter 7 : DNA Replication

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DNA Replication, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

DNA replication is a topic usually presented in 9th-grade biology. The essential fact of DNA replication is that the base-pairing rules make it very easy to generate two identical new helices from one helix. The first part is appropriate for young students; more advanced students will perform both parts of the lesson. The first activity described in this chapter is a simple (and necessarily inaccurate) paper simulation of DNA replication. The second activity is a student reading about DNA polymerase, the central DNA replication enzyme. The background information in the introduction that follows contains far more detail about DNA replication. The two aspects of DNA synthesis that your advanced students need to know are that synthesis is unidirectional and that it absolutely requires a primer. Not surprisingly, the characteristics of DNA polymerase determine the overall features of DNA replication inside the cell and in the test tube. The feature of DNA replication means that DNA synthesis is unidirectional, from 5' to 3'. Uni-directionality presents a problem for chromosome replication that is discussed in this chapter. Chromosomal DNA replication is usually initiated at specific sites along the DNA called replication origins. Instead, several different strategies circumvent the problem created by the specificity of DNA replication enzymes.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. DNA Replication, p 179-186. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch7

Key Concept Ranking

DNA Synthesis
0.91866004
Genetic Recombination
0.784342
DNA Replication
0.7804775
Chromosomal DNA
0.69100183
0.91866004
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Figures

Image of Figure 7.1
Figure 7.1

DNA polymerase (not shown) checks the pairing of an incoming deoxynucleoside triphosphate with the template base and then forms a new phosphodiester bond between the 5′ phosphate group of the new nucleotide and the 3′ hydroxyl group of the previous nucleotide.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. DNA Replication, p 179-186. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch7
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Image of Figure 7.2
Figure 7.2

The lagging strand is synthesized as Okazaki fragments during DNA replication.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. DNA Replication, p 179-186. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch7
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Image of Figure 7.3
Figure 7.3

This model for the simultaneous replication of both DNA strands (described in the text) has been christened the “trombone model.”

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. DNA Replication, p 179-186. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch7
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Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. DNA Replication, p 179-186. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch7
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
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Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. DNA Replication, p 179-186. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Teachers, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816100.ch7
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

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