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Chapter 4 : See No Evil

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Abstract:

Silence is never golden where food safety is concerned, and ignorance is never bliss. Fifty-three people were made ill—and eight of them died— because Pilgrim’s Pride and JL Foods flouted food safety rules. This chapter illustrates a few cases where companies have compromised on food safety rules. And USDA, which is both the promoter and the policeman of the U.S. agricultural industry, abrogated its responsibility to enforce those rules by closing its collective eyes, ears, and mouth to long-standing problems at both plants. Many companies regard microbiological testing of raw ingredients, environmental samples, and finished products as a nonproductive expense. Listeriosis, the most common disease syndrome caused by , has a long incubation period. also can be transmitted from one processing plant to another through the purchase and installation of used equipment. Jack Lambersky Poultry Company Inc ( JL Foods) had a prior history of in its finished product. On that basis alone, company management was required to incorporate into its Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) program under the 1999 review notice. Yet JL Foods ignored its past experience and claimed that it was not at significant risk for contamination. And, even though it knew the company’s history of -positive samples, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) silently acquiesced.

Citation: Entis P. 2007. See No Evil, p 53-68. In Food Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816186.ch4

Key Concept Ranking

Salmonella enterica
0.51143104
Listeria monocytogenes
0.45815703
0.51143104
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Figures

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Figure 4.1

Producing cocoa liquor from raw cocoa beans.

Citation: Entis P. 2007. See No Evil, p 53-68. In Food Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816186.ch4
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Image of Figure 4.2
Figure 4.2

Finished chocolate production.

Citation: Entis P. 2007. See No Evil, p 53-68. In Food Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816186.ch4
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 4.1

Food-borne disease outbreaks associated with -contaminated chocolate

Citation: Entis P. 2007. See No Evil, p 53-68. In Food Safety. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816186.ch4

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