1887

Chapter 6 : The Mycobacterial Infections: Buruli Ulcer and Leprosy

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $7.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

The Mycobacterial Infections: Buruli Ulcer and Leprosy, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555816339/9781555816711_Chap06-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555816339/9781555816711_Chap06-2.gif

Abstract:

This chapter considers two serious and important mycobacterial infections of the poor--Buruli ulcer and leprosy, which have not benefited from the same level of advocacy as tuberculosis (TB). Buruli ulcer and leprosy are two highly disfiguring and stigmatizing NTDs occurring almost exclusively among the impoverished living in developing countries. Buruli ulcer is a highly disfiguring skin infection caused by . Although it is typically painless and rarely results in death, the ulcer of Buruli disease has a number of catastrophic consequences for the patient, including a profound socioeconomic impact and the widespread belief that witchcraft and curses play an important role in transmitting the disease. Leprosy (also known as Hansen’s disease) is caused by . Due to its profoundly disfiguring clinical features, there are numerous accounts of leprosy in ancient texts. Lepraphobia was extant throughout medieval Europe. Today, as a result of widespread availability and use of MDT, the global registered prevalence of leprosy has been reduced to 224,000 cases with an estimated 259,000 new cases detected annually. Leprosy proceeds along either one of two clinical courses. The majority of patients develop the so-called tuberculoid form. Such patients have the ability to mount strong immunological responses against and, as a result, develop only localized disease. These patients experience widely disseminated disease in the skin and nerves and even the eyes, nose, mouth, and bones. The most widely used MDT drug regimen calls for dapsone to be administered together with the antibacterial drugs rifampin and clofazimine.

Citation: Hotez, M.D., Ph.D. P. 2008. The Mycobacterial Infections: Buruli Ulcer and Leprosy, p 69-80. In Forgotten People, Forgotten Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816339.ch6

Key Concept Ranking

Buruli Ulcer
0.88390934
Skin Infections
0.74644953
Infectious Diseases
0.6743303
Immune Systems
0.58544177
Chromosomal DNA
0.5152439
0.88390934
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 6.1
Figure 6.1

National Hansen’s Disease Center, Carville, LA (Public Health Image Library, CDC [http://phil.cdc.gov]).

Citation: Hotez, M.D., Ph.D. P. 2008. The Mycobacterial Infections: Buruli Ulcer and Leprosy, p 69-80. In Forgotten People, Forgotten Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816339.ch6
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 6.2
Figure 6.2

Bronze Statue of Father Damien at the U.S. Capitol (http://www.aoc.gov/cc/art/nsh/damien.cfm).

Citation: Hotez, M.D., Ph.D. P. 2008. The Mycobacterial Infections: Buruli Ulcer and Leprosy, p 69-80. In Forgotten People, Forgotten Diseases. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816339.ch6
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555816339.ch06

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error