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Chapter 55 : Clostridial Genetics

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Abstract:

This chapter focuses on the genetics and genomics of the pathogenic clostridia, dealing exclusively with the major clostridial pathogens , , , and . There are seven distinct toxin types of , the causative agent of both human and animal botulism. These types are distinguished by their ability to produce antigenically distinct botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). Phylogenetically, these isolates represent at least three quite distinct strains, which in any other genus would be classified as separate species. The complete genome sequence of strain E88, which is a variant of the vaccine strain Massachusetts, has been determined. The study of erythromycin or macrolide-lincosamide-strep-togramin B (MLS) resistance in has predominantly focused on the Erm(B) determinant. Many different types of plasmids have been found in , including plasmids that encode antibiotic resistance, bacteriocin production and immunity, and virulence factors or toxins. Importantly, the sequenced toxigenic strain 630 has been shown to lack restriction endonucleases, despite the presence of five methylase genes, thereby making feasible the genetic analysis of virulence factors in this strain. Unfortunately, the analysis of this strain is complicated by the fact that it is resistant to both erythromycin and tetracycline, which are commonly used as selectable makers in clostridial genetics.

Citation: Lyras D, Rood J. 2006. Clostridial Genetics, p 672-687. In Fischetti V, Novick R, Ferretti J, Portnoy D, Rood J (ed), Gram-Positive Pathogens, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816513.ch55

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Mobile Genetic Elements
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Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems
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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Phylogenetic relationships of the pathogenic clostridia. The scale bar indicates 10 base changes per 100 nucleotides. (Reproduced from Stackebrandt and Rainey [ ] with the kind permission of the authors and Academic Press.)

Citation: Lyras D, Rood J. 2006. Clostridial Genetics, p 672-687. In Fischetti V, Novick R, Ferretti J, Portnoy D, Rood J (ed), Gram-Positive Pathogens, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816513.ch55
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

(A) Comparison of the genetic organization of the (B) gene regions. Regions of nucleotide sequence similarity are indicated by the same shading. The deletions in the pAMβ1 DR1-like sequences are indicated by the designation ΔDR. The filled arrows indicate the individual ORFs and their direction of transcription. The approximate locations of the palindromic sequences ( and ) but not their sizes are indicated by the boldface lines below the filled boxes. Leader peptide sequences are indicated by filled triangles. Modified from Lyras and Rood ( ). (B) Genetic organization of Tn. The ORFs and their direction of transcription are represented by blocked arrows. The region encompassed by Tn is represented by the cross-hatched box and is further indicated by the scale below the diagram. Regions encompassing DR sequences are indicated by black boxes. The target site in the recipient is also shown, as is the location of each of the ends of the element and the target sequence. (Adapted from Farrow et al. [ ].)

Citation: Lyras D, Rood J. 2006. Clostridial Genetics, p 672-687. In Fischetti V, Novick R, Ferretti J, Portnoy D, Rood J (ed), Gram-Positive Pathogens, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816513.ch55
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Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

Excision and insertion model of Tn. Tn encodes six genes, as shown by the arrows, and is flanked by directly repeated GA dinucleotides. The TnpX-mediated excision of Tn leads to the formation of the circular form of the transposon, which carries one of the dinucleotides at the joint, and a deletion plasmid, in which one dinucleotide remains at the deletion site. Note the location of the components of the promoter. (Modified from Lyras and Rood [ ].)

Citation: Lyras D, Rood J. 2006. Clostridial Genetics, p 672-687. In Fischetti V, Novick R, Ferretti J, Portnoy D, Rood J (ed), Gram-Positive Pathogens, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816513.ch55
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Image of FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4

Genetic organization of the putative enterotoxin transposon Tn. The organization of the chromosomal gene region is shown. ORFs are indicated by the arrows. The insertion elements are shown by the gray boxes. The scale is shown in kilobases. (Modified from Rood [ ].)

Citation: Lyras D, Rood J. 2006. Clostridial Genetics, p 672-687. In Fischetti V, Novick R, Ferretti J, Portnoy D, Rood J (ed), Gram-Positive Pathogens, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816513.ch55
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References

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Tables

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TABLE 1

Properties of - shuttle plasmids

For details and sources, see references and ; based on Table 5.1 from reference . For details on PFF, see reference .

Ap, Cm, Em, resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and erythromycin, respectively. XG, screening for β-galactosidase production on X-Gal medium.

These plasmids carry the RP4 region and can therefore be mobilized, in the presence of plasmid RP4, to recipient cells ( ).

Citation: Lyras D, Rood J. 2006. Clostridial Genetics, p 672-687. In Fischetti V, Novick R, Ferretti J, Portnoy D, Rood J (ed), Gram-Positive Pathogens, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816513.ch55

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