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Chapter 19 : : Nonvertebrate Hosts and the Emergence of Virulence

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Abstract:

Several nonvertebrate hosts has been used to investigate virulence traits and therapies for several bacterial and fungal pathogens. This chapter details the use of heterologous hosts for the study of . A striking finding was the correlation between known mammalian virulence factors such as the capsule, melanin, and phospholipase and their necessity for survival in amoebae. Many of the assays used when working with macrophages can be modified for use with , including killing assays, trypan blue staining, and phagocytosis assays. Although many virulence traits have shown some concordance in their requirement for both mammalian and protozoan virulence, there are some discrepancies. Two assays have been developed using as a host to study . The first assay, termed the ‘’killing assay’’, was initially utilized to identify mutants reduced in virulence. Another assay has been developed based on the observation of smaller nematode brood size when infected with pathogenic . Mutants of Pka1 or Gpa1 (the α subunit) are reduced in virulence in , similar to the observed virulence in mice studies. Acapsular mutants also displayed attenuated virulence in and infection assays, although they remain virulent in infection assays. Since the genus includes a large set of organisms, all of which are also presumably under ameboid predator selection in soils and are able to survive in their environments, the avirulence of most species represents the absence of a complete trait set for animal hosts.

Citation: Coleman J, Chrisman C, Casadevall A, Mylonakis E. 2011. : Nonvertebrate Hosts and the Emergence of Virulence, p 261-267. In Heitman J, Kozel T, Kwon-Chung K, Perfect J, Casadevall A (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816858.ch19

Key Concept Ranking

Major Facilitator Superfamily
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Immune Systems
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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Interaction of and in liquid culture. The two organisms are shown after 2 h of incubation in phosphate-buffered saline. The () strain 24067 ingested by the () is indicated by the arrow. Image was taken at 40×.

Citation: Coleman J, Chrisman C, Casadevall A, Mylonakis E. 2011. : Nonvertebrate Hosts and the Emergence of Virulence, p 261-267. In Heitman J, Kozel T, Kwon-Chung K, Perfect J, Casadevall A (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816858.ch19
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Accumulation of in the gastrointestional tract of . Intact yeast cells are visible in the gastrointestional tract (black arrows) after feeding for 36 h on strain KN99α. The white arrows indicate the pharyngeal grinder of the digestive tract of . Photos reprinted from reference .

Citation: Coleman J, Chrisman C, Casadevall A, Mylonakis E. 2011. : Nonvertebrate Hosts and the Emergence of Virulence, p 261-267. In Heitman J, Kozel T, Kwon-Chung K, Perfect J, Casadevall A (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816858.ch19
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

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Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

Comparison of heterologous model hosts for

Citation: Coleman J, Chrisman C, Casadevall A, Mylonakis E. 2011. : Nonvertebrate Hosts and the Emergence of Virulence, p 261-267. In Heitman J, Kozel T, Kwon-Chung K, Perfect J, Casadevall A (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816858.ch19
Generic image for table
TABLE 2

virulence factors involved in pathogenesis on heterologous model hosts

Citation: Coleman J, Chrisman C, Casadevall A, Mylonakis E. 2011. : Nonvertebrate Hosts and the Emergence of Virulence, p 261-267. In Heitman J, Kozel T, Kwon-Chung K, Perfect J, Casadevall A (ed), . ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816858.ch19

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