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2 : West Nile Virus Infection in New York City: the Public Health Perspective

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West Nile Virus Infection in New York City: the Public Health Perspective, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

West Nile virus belongs to the Japanese encephalitis serocomplex of flaviviruses that includes the medically important St. Louis encephalitis, Murray Valley encephalitis, and Kunjin viruses. Most West Nile virus infections among humans are subclinical, with overt disease occurring in approximately 1 of 100 infections. The most common mosquito species in New York City, and many other northern urban areas, is , a competent vector for a variety of mosquito-borne viral encephalitides. Viral meningitis and encephalitis are 2 of 70 reportable diseases or conditions in New York City and New York State. In recent years the New York City Department of Health has been actively promoting the importance of physician reporting of unusual disease clusters or manifestations because of concerns about both the early detection of new or reemerging infectious diseases and the threat of bioterrorism. The media was likely the most effective conduit for informing the public about the disease and the city's public health response. The ongoing public health response to the West Nile virus outbreak included active surveillance to fully define the geographic extent of the outbreak and to evaluate the need for additional mosquito control measures. Public health messages regarding protective measures for avoidance of West Nile virus infection and West Nile disease surveillance should therefore be particularly targeted at older persons.

Citation: Nash D, Cohen N, Layton M. 2001. West Nile Virus Infection in New York City: the Public Health Perspective, p 11-28. In Scheld W, Craig W, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 5. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816988.ch2

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West nile virus
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Japanese encephalitis virus
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Dengue virus
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Figures

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Figure 1

Geographic distribution of the Japanese encephalitis serocomplex of viruses related to West Nile virus. Reprinted with permission from the Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colo.

Citation: Nash D, Cohen N, Layton M. 2001. West Nile Virus Infection in New York City: the Public Health Perspective, p 11-28. In Scheld W, Craig W, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 5. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816988.ch2
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Geographic distribution of human West Nile virus disease detected in the New York City area during outbreaks in 1999 and 2000.

Citation: Nash D, Cohen N, Layton M. 2001. West Nile Virus Infection in New York City: the Public Health Perspective, p 11-28. In Scheld W, Craig W, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 5. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816988.ch2
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Image of Figure 3
Figure 3

Viral meningitis and encephalitis surveillance, New York City, 1997 to 1999.

Citation: Nash D, Cohen N, Layton M. 2001. West Nile Virus Infection in New York City: the Public Health Perspective, p 11-28. In Scheld W, Craig W, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 5. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816988.ch2
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Image of Figure 4
Figure 4

Number and attack rate of clinical West Nile virus infections ( = 59) in the New York City (NYC) area, 1999, by age group.

Citation: Nash D, Cohen N, Layton M. 2001. West Nile Virus Infection in New York City: the Public Health Perspective, p 11-28. In Scheld W, Craig W, Hughes J (ed), Emerging Infections 5. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555816988.ch2
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References

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