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Chapter 1 : The Public Health, Industrial, and Global Significance of Rapid Microbiological Food Testing

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The Public Health, Industrial, and Global Significance of Rapid Microbiological Food Testing, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter covers the basic arguments for why individuals are increasingly turning to rapid methods to meet the microbiological testing needs in all facets of food production, including regulatory compliance and food-related outbreaks. Rapid methods are defined in the chapter as alternative microbiological testing methods that are able to provide reliable test results in a shorter time than those obtained by culture cultivation. Rapid methods offer the promise of improving the risk assessment and modeling process by increasing the amount of data and information available for use in developing risk assessments as well as reducing the uncertainty associated with the data that are used. Rapid methods for microbial testing of foods often introduce timescales and volumes for information generation that are incompatible with descriptive decision making.

Citation: Hoorfar J, Cahill S, Clarke R, Barker G, Fazil A, Wong D, Feng P. 2011. The Public Health, Industrial, and Global Significance of Rapid Microbiological Food Testing, p 1-12. In Hoorfar J (ed), Rapid Detection, Characterization, and Enumeration of Foodborne Pathogens. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817121.ch1
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References

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