1887

Chapter 4 : Girolamo Fracastoro and Contagion in Renaissance Medicine

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $7.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Girolamo Fracastoro and Contagion in Renaissance Medicine, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817220/9781555815295_Chap04-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817220/9781555815295_Chap04-2.gif

Abstract:

By the mid-1500s, accessibility to Latin-translated, ancient Greek medical texts and the commentaries condemning Avicenna led to a decreased reliance on his work in Western Europe, although by no means was the Canon of Medicine disregarded. The decreased dependence on the Canon led to disregard of many of its innovative concepts, including contagion, in Western Europe. To the modern reader, a disregard of the concept of contagion seems hard to reconcile with the presence of two diseases of the period: plague and syphilis. The Black Death continued its periodic appearances during the Renaissance. In 1525 Girolamo Fracastoro completed an earlier version of the poem, . For the next 16 years after the publication of , Fracastoro worked on a book that he asserted was "not as a poet but as a doctor," , or , published in 1546. Precisely where his ideas emerged for is in doubt. Fracastoro's fame from his epic poem helped ensure the initial publication in 1546 and at least two additional printings of by 1555. The reaction to Fracastoro's in his own time ranged from hostile to favorable, but even the positive responses were tepid. For all 's limitations, it is extraordinary how well Fracastoro described modes of transmission for microorganisms, having no idea of their existence.

Citation: Gaynes R. 2011. Girolamo Fracastoro and Contagion in Renaissance Medicine, p 45-61. In Germ Theory. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817220.ch4

Key Concept Ranking

Infectious Diseases
0.67031854
Spotted Fever
0.51785713
Bubonic Plague
0.51785713
Spotted Fever
0.51785713
Bubonic Plague
0.51785713
Syphilis
0.5
Lymph Node
0.44825768
0.67031854
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Untitled
Untitled

Citation: Gaynes R. 2011. Girolamo Fracastoro and Contagion in Renaissance Medicine, p 45-61. In Germ Theory. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817220.ch4
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Untitled
Untitled

10.1128/9781555817220.ch4.f0

Citation: Gaynes R. 2011. Girolamo Fracastoro and Contagion in Renaissance Medicine, p 45-61. In Germ Theory. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817220.ch4
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 1.
Figure 1.

Girolamo Fracastoro. Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine. 10.1128/9781555817220.ch4.f1

Citation: Gaynes R. 2011. Girolamo Fracastoro and Contagion in Renaissance Medicine, p 45-61. In Germ Theory. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817220.ch4
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817220.ch04
1. Fracastoro, G. 1930. Hieronymi Fracastorii—De Contagione et Contagiosis Morbis et Eorum Curatione, Libri III. Translation and notes by Wilmer C., Wright. G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York, NY.
2. Garrison, F. 1910. Fracastorius, Athanasius Kircher and the germ theory of disease. Science 31:500502.
3. Harper, K. N.,, P. S. Ocampo,, B. M. Steiner,, R. W. George,, M. S. Silverman, et al. 2008. On the origin of the treponematoses: a phylogenetic approach. PLoS Neg. Trop. Dis. 2:113.
4. Howard-Jones, N. 1977. Fracastoro and Henle: a re-appraisal of their contribution to the concept of communicable diseases. Med. History 21:6168.
5. Knell, R. J. 2004. Syphilis in Renaissance Europe: rapid evolution of an introduced sexually transmitted disease. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B (Suppl.) 271:S174S176.
6. Naphy, W., and, A. Spicer. 2004. Plague: Black Death and Pestilence in Europe. Tempus Publishing Limited, Stroud, United Kingdom.
7. Nutton, V. 1990. The reception of Fracastoro’s theory of contagion. The seed that fell among thorns? OSIRIS 6:196234.
8. Nutton, V. 1983. The seeds of disease: an explanation of contagion and infection from Greeks to the Renaissance. Med. History 27:134.
9. Sherman, I. W. 2007. Twelve Diseases That Changed Our World, p. 6882. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
10. Siraisi, N. G. 1982. Some recent work on Western European medical learning, ca. 1200–ca. 1500. History of Universities 2:225238.
11. Siraisi, N. G. 1987. Avicenna in Renaissance Italy. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error