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Chapter 10 : Motivating through Intelligent Leadership

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Abstract:

The goal of this chapter is to take the basic theories of motivation and apply them to real-life settings in the laboratory by relating some experiences that the author has had during his tenure in the profession. The author intends to make these management theories real and applicable to laboratorians. The chapter considers how the natural internal motivation in people can be sparked by effective leadership. For healthcare leaders, the question becomes, how do we continuously ignite this type of motivation in the people around us whom we depend on most to provide this care? The answer lies in the leader’s intimate knowledge of his or her self. An effective leader will collaboratively set goals with those involved in the work based on the vision of the organization and then enable those people to use their abilities to accomplish the goal. A leader must enable people to achieve, accomplish, and grow, and then recognize the achievement. The chapter discusses one of the components of emotional intelligence, self-motivation. Self-motivation is drive, positivity, and passion to achieve. According to David McClelland's human motivation theory, people can have one of three dominant motivators — achievement, affiliation, and power. Reigniting the motivation in a person to lead will produce motivation in those whom he leads.

Citation: Pardue C. 2014. Motivating through Intelligent Leadership, p 243-249. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817282.ch10

Key Concept Ranking

Lead
0.92071426
Transformation
0.56147105
Weathering
0.42568684
Adaptation
0.42568684
0.92071426
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Figure 10.1

The onion of emotional intelligence. doi:10.1128/9781555817282.chl0.f1

Citation: Pardue C. 2014. Motivating through Intelligent Leadership, p 243-249. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817282.ch10
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References

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1. Collins, J. 2001. Level 5 leadership: the triumph of humility and fierce resolve. Harvard Business Review 79:6676, 175.
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10. Schwartz, T. 2010. Leadership begins at home. Harvard Business Review Blog Network. November 23, 2010. http://blogs.hbr .org/schwartz/2010/ll/one-of-the-greatest-gifts.html (last accessed February 27, 2013).
11. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2012. Pay for Performance (P4P): AHRQ resources. March 2012. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD. www.ahrq.gov/qual/pay4per ,htm#intro (last accessed May 2, 2012).
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Tables

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Table 10.1

The three dominant motivators in McClelland's human motivation theory

Citation: Pardue C. 2014. Motivating through Intelligent Leadership, p 243-249. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817282.ch10

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