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Chapter 17 : Staffing and Scheduling

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Abstract:

This chapter explains the dynamics of staffing and scheduling laboratory personnel with respect to current labor trends and business requirement. The availability of trained individuals to perform laboratory testing is and should be a concern for laboratory managers. The chapter describes the personnel classifications as determined by governing bodies, accreditation agencies, and specific laboratory needs. Each technologist or technician must be competent to perform laboratory tests based on the specific policies and procedures of the laboratory. Training and competence must be documented within personnel records. In addition, on-the-job training may be integrated into the laboratory for those with the minimum education required. The chapter compares and contrasts traditional versus alternative staffing plans, using personnel classification and qualification and service requirements. It describes key success factors for laboratory scheduling and metrics for effectiveness and efficiency. The laboratory manager should not only understand the factors that are critical to the success of the laboratory but also be able to demonstrate or document these key areas. The laboratory manager should consider the impact of staffing decisions on the facility or physician using the laboratory. Using self-directed teams reduces the time demands on the laboratory manager while providing job enrichment and satisfaction.

Citation: Medvescek P. 2014. Staffing and Scheduling, p 362-372. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817282.ch17

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References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817282.chap17
1.Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. 2012. Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012–13 Edition, Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians, http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-and-clinical-laboratory-technologists-and-technicians.htm (accessed May 6, 2012).
2.College of American Pathologists. 2012. Laboratory general checklist. #GEN.54200, #GEN55500. College of American Pathologists Laboratory Accreditation Program. Northfield, IL.
3.College of American Pathologists. Laboratory management index program (LMIP). http://www.cap.org/apps/cap.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=accreditation (accessed May 6, 2012).
4. Enrado, P. 2009. Hospitals face new challenge in controlling labor costs. Healthcare Finance News. http://www.healthcarefinancenews .com/news/hospitals-face-new-challenge-controlling-labor-costs (accessed May 6, 2012).
5. Kibak, P. 2008. The worsening shortage of lab staff: what's being done to turn it around? Clin. Lab. News 34(5). http://aacc.org/publications/ cln/2008/may/Pages/cover1_0508.aspx# (accessed May 6, 2012).
6. LeClaire, J. Stress-management tips for healthcare workers. Monster.com. http://career advice.monster.com/in-the-office/Work-Life-Balance/Stress-Management-Tips-in Healthcare/article.aspx (accessed May 6, 2012).
7. Malone, B. 2011. Trends in recruitment and retention: how can labs thrive despite the staffing shortage? Clin. Lab. News 37(5). http://www.aacc.org/publications/cln/2011/May/Pages/TrendsinRecruitment.aspx# (accessed May 6, 2012).

Tables

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Table 17.1

Average labor expenses as percentage of total expenses

Average wage adjusted, excluding physician compensation, including salary, wages, and benefits. Source: data, 2010 (Truven Health Analytics, http://truvenhealth.com/products/action_oi.aspx).

Citation: Medvescek P. 2014. Staffing and Scheduling, p 362-372. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817282.ch17
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Table 17.2

Generalist versus specialist models

Citation: Medvescek P. 2014. Staffing and Scheduling, p 362-372. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817282.ch17
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Table 17.3

Staffing ratio: costs and benefits

Citation: Medvescek P. 2014. Staffing and Scheduling, p 362-372. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817282.ch17
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Table 17.4

Flexible staffing

Source: ActionOI® data, 2010.

Smaller (<100 beds) or larger (>600 beds) hospitals are less likely to routinely cancel, reschedule, or float staff than mid-sized facilities.

Major teaching facilities are less apt to routinely cancel, reschedule, or float staff than minor teaching or nonteaching facilities.

Citation: Medvescek P. 2014. Staffing and Scheduling, p 362-372. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817282.ch17
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Table 17.5

Shift scheduling template

Citation: Medvescek P. 2014. Staffing and Scheduling, p 362-372. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817282.ch17
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Table 17.6

Scheduling alternatives

Citation: Medvescek P. 2014. Staffing and Scheduling, p 362-372. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Laboratory Management, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817282.ch17

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