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Chapter 14 : Biothreat Agents

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Abstract:

The ideal qualities for a successful biothreat agent are a high rate of illness in exposed persons/animals, a high case fatality rate, a short incubation period, and a paucity of immunity in the targeted population. Success is also influenced by the availability of treatment, the ability of the agent to transmit from person to person, and the ease with which the agent can be produced and disseminated; in addition, a disease that is, at least initially, difficult to recognize clinically or diagnose contributes to the success of the agent. General clues that one could be dealing with an unrecognized bioterror event include a large outbreak of illness with a high death rate, a recognized case(s) of an uncommon disease, disease in a region of the world where the disease is not endemic, disease out of its usual seasonality, simultaneous outbreaks of the same disease in various part of the country or world, and sick and dying animals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has classified potential biothreat agents into categories on the basis of their threat to national security, with those organisms belonging to category A being the most serious threats. These and other agents are discussed in this chapter.

Citation: Sharp S, Loeffelholz M. 2015. Biothreat Agents, p 217-225. In Jorgensen J, Pfaller M, Carroll K, Funke G, Landry M, Richter S, Warnock D (ed), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, Eleventh Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817381.ch14
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FIGURE 1

Structure of the Laboratory Response Network. doi:10.1128/9781555817381.ch14.f1

Citation: Sharp S, Loeffelholz M. 2015. Biothreat Agents, p 217-225. In Jorgensen J, Pfaller M, Carroll K, Funke G, Landry M, Richter S, Warnock D (ed), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, Eleventh Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817381.ch14
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References

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Tables

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TABLE 1

HHS and USDA select agents and toxins (with biothreat categories)

Citation: Sharp S, Loeffelholz M. 2015. Biothreat Agents, p 217-225. In Jorgensen J, Pfaller M, Carroll K, Funke G, Landry M, Richter S, Warnock D (ed), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, Eleventh Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817381.ch14
Generic image for table
TABLE 2

Summary of biothreat agent characteristics

Citation: Sharp S, Loeffelholz M. 2015. Biothreat Agents, p 217-225. In Jorgensen J, Pfaller M, Carroll K, Funke G, Landry M, Richter S, Warnock D (ed), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, Eleventh Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817381.ch14

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