1887

Chapter 16.10 : Smallpox—Variola Major

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Smallpox—Variola Major, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817435/9781555815271_Chap16_10-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817435/9781555815271_Chap16_10-2.gif

Abstract:

Variola virus, the etiologic agent of smallpox, is considered among the highly virulent microorganisms likely to be used in bioterrorism activities. If a community exposure to variola virus occurs, the challenge for the clinical microbiology laboratory will be threefold: (i) management of clinical specimens and/or viral isolates safely and appropriately, (ii) recognition of the agent within the limitations of routine testing, and (iii) rapid notification of a potential outbreak to the proper authorities.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Smallpox—Variola Major, p 794-798. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch16.10
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817435.chap16.10
1. Behbehani, A. B., 1995. Poxviruses, p. 511520. In E. H. Lennette,, D. A. Lennette,, and E. T. Lennette (ed.), Viral, Rickettsial, and Chlamydial Infections, 7th ed. American Public Health Association, Washington, DC.
2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2000. Biological and chemical terrorism: strategic plan for preparedness and response. MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 49(RR-4):114.
3. Esposito, J. J.,, and J. H. Nakano,. 1992. Human poxviruses, p. 643668. In E. H. Lennette (ed.), Laboratory Diagnosis of Viral Infections, 2nd ed. Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, NY.
4. Gilchrist, M. J. R.,, W. P. McKinney,, J. M. Miller,, and A. S. Weissfeld,. 2000. Cumitech 33, Laboratory Safety, Management, and Diagnosis of Biological Agents Associated with Bioterrorism. Coordinating ed., J. W. Snyder. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
5. Henderson, D. A.,, T. V. Inglesby,, J. G. Bartlett,, M. S. Ascher,, E. Eitzen,, P. B. Jahrling,, J. Hauer,, M. Layton,, J. McDade,, M. T. Osterholm,, T. O’Toole,, G. Parker,, T. Perl,, P. Russell,, and K. Tonat. 1999. Smallpox as a biological weapon: medical and public health management. JAMA 281:21272137.
6. Kleitmann, W. F.,, and K. L. Ruoff. 2001. Bioterrorism: implications for the clinical microbiologist. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 14:364381.
7. Nakano, J. H.,, and J. J. Esposito,. 1989. Poxviruses, p. 224265. In N. J. Schmidt, and R. W. Emmons (ed.), Diagnostic Procedure for Viral, Rickettsial, and Chlamydial Infections, 6th ed. American Public Health Association, Washington, DC.
8. Ropp, S. L.,, Q. Jin,, J. C. Knight,, R. F. Massung,, and J. J. Esposito. 1995. PCR strategy for identification and differentiation of smallpox and other orthopoxviruses. J. Clin. Microbiol. 33:20692076.
9. Ropp, S. L.,, J. J. Esposito,, V. N. Loparev,, and G. J. Palumbo,. 1999. Poxviruses infecting humans, p. 11371144. In P. R. Murray,, F. Tenover,, E. J. Baron,, M. A. Pfaller,, and R. H. Yolken (ed.), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 7th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 16.10-1

Clinical conditions with symptoms compatible with smallpox

A miscellaneous viral exanthem (skin rash) would include infections caused by herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, enteroviruses, or other poxviruses, such as the agents of vaccinia or molluscum contagiosum or poxviruses that can be passed from animals to humans. A careful clinical history, including travel and animal exposure, along with the appropriate diagnostic tests will aid in differentiation of the zoonotic poxvirus infections, which include monkeypox, cowpox, buffalopox, camelpox, orf, bovine papular stomatitis, sealpox, yabapox, and tanapox.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Smallpox—Variola Major, p 794-798. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch16.10
Generic image for table
Table 16.10-2

Differentiation of smallpox virus from other agents of infection

Tissue cultures that will support the growth of smallpox include human embryonic lung (HEL) cells, infant human fibroblasts (IHF) or other human fibroblast lines, chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF), and various types of monkey kidney cell lines (MK). CPE, cytopathic effect.

See the footnote to Table 16.10-1 .

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Smallpox—Variola Major, p 794-798. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch16.10

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error