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Chapter 16.6 : Brucellosis— spp.

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Abstract:

is a fastidious, intracellular, aerobic, small gram-negative coccobacillus. Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease caused by four species that are recognized as human pathogens: (cattle), (goats, sheep, and camels), (pigs), and (dogs). There have been rare reports of naturally acquired infections of humans with a marine mammal-associated species of ( ). These isolates are most closely related to .

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Brucellosis— spp., p 769-773. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch16.6
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Figures

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Figure 16.6-1

species sentinel-level laboratory flowchart.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Brucellosis— spp., p 769-773. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch16.6
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References

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1. Bossi, P.,, A. Tegnell,, A. Baka,, F. Van Loock,, J. Hendriks,, A. Werner,, H. Maidhof,, and G. Gouvras. 2004. Bichat Guidelines for the Clinical Management of Brucellosis and Bioterrorism-Related Brucellosis. Eurosurveillance 9:15.
2.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2000. Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response: Basic Laboratory Protocols for the Presumptive Identification of Brucella Species. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
3. Chu, M. C.,, D. Lindquist,, and W. S. Probert,. 2007. Francisella and Brucella, p. 815834. In P. R. Murray,, E. J. Baron,, J. H. Jorgensen,, M. A. Pfaller,, and M. L. Landry (ed.), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 9th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
4. Chusid, M. J.,, R. W. Perzigian,, W. M. Dunne,, and E. A. Gecht. 1989. Brucellosis: an unusual cause of a child’s fever of unknown origin. Wis. Med. J. 88:1113.
5.Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. 2008. Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing. Eighteenth informational supplement. CLSI document M100-S18. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, Wayne, PA.
6. Gilchrist, M. J. R.,, W. P. McKinney,, J. M. Miller,, and A. S. Weissfeld. 2000. Cumitech 33, Laboratory Safety, Management, and Diagnosis of Biological Agents Associated with Bioterrorism. Coordinating ed., J. W. Snyder. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
7. Hoover, D.,, and A. Friedlander. 1997. Brucellosis, p. 513521. In Textbook of Military Medicine: Medical Aspects of Chemical and Biological Warfare. U.S. Department of the Army, Surgeon General, and the Borden Institute, Washington, DC.
8.Laboratory Response Network. 2004. Sentinel Laboratory Guidelines for Suspected Agents of Bioterrorism: Brucella Species. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC.
9. MacFaddin, J. F. 2000 Oxidase test, p. 368378. In Biochemical Tests for Identification of Medical Bacteria, 3rd ed. The Lippincott, Williams&Wilkins Co., Philadelphia, PA.
10. MacFaddin, J. F. 1980. Urease test, p. 298. In Biochemical Tests for Identification of Medical Bacteria, 2nd ed. Waverly Press, Inc., Baltimore, MD.
11. McDonald, W. L.,, R. Jamaludin,, G. Mackereth,, M. Hansen,, S. Humphrey,, P. Short,, T. Taylor,, J. Swingler,, C. E. Dawson,, A. M. Whatmore,, E. Stubberfield,, L. L. Perrett,, and G. Simmons. 2006. Characterization of a Brucella sp. strain as a marine-mammal type despite isolation from a patient with spinal osteomyelitis in New Zealand. J. Clin. Microbiol. 44:43634370.
12. Miller, J. M. 2000. The laboratory response to agents of bioterrorism. American Society for Microbiology Audioconference Series. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC.
13.U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2007. Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, 5th ed. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.
14. Weyant, R. S.,, C.W. Moss,, R. E. Weaver,, D. G. Hollis,, J. G. Jordan,, E. C. Cook,, and M. I. Daneshvar. 1996. Identification of Unusual Pathogenic Gram-Negative Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Bacteria, 2nd ed. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, MD.
15. Weyant,, Weyant, R. S.,, C. W. Moss,, R. E. Weaver,, D. G. Hollis,, J. G. Jordan,, E. C. Cook,, and M. I. Daneshvar. 2001. Laboratory Protocols for Bioterrorism Response Laboratories for the Identification of Brucella Species. Association for Public Health Laboratories, Washington, DC.
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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 16.6-1

Differentiation of spp. from other similar organisms

Specimen sources are as follows: spp., blood and bone marrow; spp., urinary tract; and , various.

Enhanced by cysteine (some strains fail to grow on blood agar when subcultured).

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Brucellosis— spp., p 769-773. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch16.6

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