1887

Chapter 3.16 : Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817435/9781555815271_Chap3_16-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555817435/9781555815271_Chap3_16-2.gif

Abstract:

On the following pages are 48 biochemical procedures in alphabetical order, including both simple, rapid test procedures and standard conventional methods, for the identification of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The biochemical tests have been selected that are most useful to laboratories, with emphasis on rapid testing. The list of tests includes the generally accepted tests that all laboratories should be able to perform to identify the clinically important microorganisms encountered in the laboratory, as well as some for use by reference or referral laboratories. Smaller laboratories may choose to perform fewer tests and refer cultures when less common microorganisms are found in culture. When identification to the species level is not clinically important, tests to separate these species are not included. When there is a choice of different tests that can be performed, both are presented and the user can choose which is preferable for use in the laboratory.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817435.chap3.16
1. Carroll, K. C.,, and M. P. Weinstein,. 2007. Manual and automated systems for detection and identification of microorganisms, p. 192211. In P. R. Murray,, E. J. Baron,, J. H. Jorgensen,, M. L. Landry,, and M. A. Pfaller (ed.), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 9th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
2. Funke, G.,, and K. A. Bernard,. 2003. Coryneform gram-positive rods, p. 480. In P. R. Murray,, E. J. Baron,, J. H. Jorgensen,, M. A. Pfaller,, and R. H. Yolken (ed.), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 8th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
3. Rennie, R. P.,, C. Brosnikoff,, L. Turnbull,, L. B. Reller,, S. Mirrett,, W. Janda,, K. Ristow,, and A. Krilcich. 2008. Multicenter evaluation of the Vitek 2 anaerobe and Corynebacterium identification card. J. Clin. Microbiol. 46:26462651.
1. Baron, E. J.,, L. Peterson,, and S. M. Fine-gold. 1994. Bailey and Scott's Diagnostic Microbiology, 9th ed., p. 170171. Mosby, St. Louis, MO.
2.Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. 2006. Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disk Susceptibility Tests, 9th ed. Approved standard M2-A9. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, Wayne, PA.
3. McFarland, J. 1907. Nephelometer: an instrument for estimating the number of bacteria in suspensions used for calculating the opsonic index and for vaccines. JAMA 49:11761178.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 3.16-1a

Summary of bacterial identification systems

Microbact 12A and 12B are in strip format; the 12E and 24E have microplate formats.

RT, room temperature.

Combination identification and susceptibility panels are also available: NMIC/ID and PMIC/ID for gram-negative and gram-positive organisms, respectively.

See reference for performance data for the new Vitek 2 ANC card.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-1b

Summary of bacterial identification systems

Microbact 12A and 12B are in strip format; the 12E and 24E have microplate formats.

RT, room temperature.

Combination identification and susceptibility panels are also available: NMIC/ID and PMIC/ID for gram-negative and gram-positive organisms, respectively.

See reference for performance data for the new Vitek 2 ANC card.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-1c

Summary of bacterial identification systems

Microbact 12A and 12B are in strip format; the 12E and 24E have microplate formats.

RT, room temperature.

Combination identification and susceptibility panels are also available: NMIC/ID and PMIC/ID for gram-negative and gram-positive organisms, respectively.

See reference for performance data for the new Vitek 2 ANC card.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-2a-a

Database entries of the (human isolates) for manual systems

Reproduced from reference .

Some products give a choice between two species; the alternate species is indicated in parentheses.

#, genus-level identification only.

Previous taxonomic designation.

Able to differentiate O111 from O157.

Also contains 10 unnamed enteric groups in the database.

“Group” indicates group.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-2a-b

Database entries of the (human isolates) for manual systems

Reproduced from reference .

Some products give a choice between two species; the alternate species is indicated in parentheses.

#, genus-level identification only.

Previous taxonomic designation.

Able to differentiate O111 from O157.

Also contains 10 unnamed enteric groups in the database.

“Group” indicates group.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-2b-a

Database entries of the (human isolates) for automated systems

Reproduced from reference . Some products give a choice between two species; the alternate species is in parentheses.

Includes the ability to differentiate between serogroups O111 and O157

#, genus identification only.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-2b-b

Database entries of the (human isolates) for automated systems

Reproduced from reference . Some products give a choice between two species; the alternate species is in parentheses.

Includes the ability to differentiate between serogroups O111 and O157

#, genus identification only.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-3a

Database entries of the gram-positive organisms (human isolates) for bioMérieux and Dade MicroSan products

Reproduced from reference . Some products give a choice between two species; the alternate species is in parentheses.

Includes the ability to differentiate between serogroups O111 and O157

#, genus identification only.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-3b

Database entries of the gram-positive organisms (human isolates) for bioMérieux and Dade MicroSan products

Reproduced from reference . Some products give a choice between two species; the alternate species is in parentheses.

Includes the ability to differentiate between serogroups O111 and O157

#, genus identification only.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-3c

Database entries of the gram-positive organisms (human isolates) for bioMérieux and Dade MicroSan products

Reproduced from reference . Some products give a choice between two species; the alternate species is in parentheses.

Includes the ability to differentiate between serogroups O111 and O157

#, genus identification only.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-4a

Databaseentriesofthegram-positive organisms for BD Diagnostics, Remel, TREK, Biolog, and MIDI products

Reproduced from reference . Some products give a choice between two species; the alternate species is indicated in parentheses.

Oxoid has a similar product for Listeria identification called the Listeria Identification System 12 S. It identifies six species.

#, genus-level identification only.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-4b

Databaseentriesofthegram-positive organisms for BD Diagnostics, Remel, TREK, Biolog, and MIDI products

Reproduced from reference . Some products give a choice between two species; the alternate species is indicated in parentheses.

Oxoid has a similar product for Listeria identification called the Listeria Identification System 12 S. It identifies six species.

#, genus-level identification only.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Table 3.16-4c

Databaseentriesofthegram-positive organisms for BD Diagnostics, Remel, TREK, Biolog, and MIDI products

Reproduced from reference . Some products give a choice between two species; the alternate species is indicated in parentheses.

Oxoid has a similar product for Listeria identification called the Listeria Identification System 12 S. It identifies six species.

#, genus-level identification only.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16
Generic image for table
Untitled

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Guidelines for Biochemical Identification of Aerobic Bacteria, p 487-502. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch3.16

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error