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Chapter 4.3 : Culture Media for Anaerobes

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Abstract:

The choice of media for use in the anaerobic bacteriology laboratory is important for the success of anaerobic bacteriology. The media must contain appropriate nutrients and supplements needed by clinically significant anaerobes. A combination of enriched, nonselective, selective, and differential media should be used for the initial processing, isolation, and presumptive identification of anaerobic bacteria from clinical specimens ( Fig. 4.3-1 and Tables 4.3-1 and 4.3-2 ) ( ). Anaerobes have a wide range of nutritional needs; most, however, require hemin and vitamin K. Some studies suggest that freshly pre-pared, properly stored, highly enriched media are essential for recovery of anaerobes ( ), while another study has shown that prereduced anaerobically sterilized (PRAS) media best support the growth of anaerobes ( ). Recent studies have suggested that using media containing oxyrase may be another alternative ( ). Media that have been exposed to air contain oxidized products that may delay or inhibit the growth of many anaerobes. The ideal media for use in anaerobic bacteriology, therefore, are those that have had limited exposure to oxygen.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Culture Media for Anaerobes, p 694-702. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch4.3
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Figures

Image of Figure 4.3-1
Figure 4.3-1

Flowchart for processing primary anaerobic culture plates. anaBAP, anaerobic blood agar plate; CAP, chocolate agar plates; RBA, rabbit blood agar.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Culture Media for Anaerobes, p 694-702. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch4.3
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References

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1. Dowell, V. R., Jr.,, G. L. Lombard,, F. S. Thompson,, and A. Y. Armfield. 1977. Media for Isolation, Characterization, and Identification of Obligately Anaerobic Bacteria. CDC laboratory manual. Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA.
2. Finegold, S. M.,, P. T. Sugihara,, and V. L. Sutter,. 1971. Use of selective media for isolation of anaerobes, p. 99108. In D. A. Shapton, and R. G. Board (ed.), Isolation of Anaerobes. Academic Press, Inc., London, England.
3. Forbes, B. A.,, D. F. Sahm,, and A. S. Weissfeld (ed.). 2007. Bailey and Scott's Diagnostic Microbiology, 12th ed. Mosby Elsevier, St. Louis, MO.
4. Hanson, C. W.,, and W. J. Martin. 1976. Evaluation of enrichment, storage, and age of blood agar medium in relation to its ability to support growth of anaerobic bacteria. J. Clin. Microbiol. 4:394399.
5. Jousimies-Somer, H. R.,, P. Summanen,, D. M. Citron,, E. J. Baron,, H. M. Wexler,, and S. M. Finegold. 2002. Wadsworth Anaerobic Bacteriology Manual, 6th ed. Star Publishing Co., Belmont, CA.
6. Livingston, S. J.,, S. D. Kominos,, and R. B. Yee. 1978. New medium for selection and presumptive identification of the Bacteroides fragilis group. J. Clin. Microbiol. 7:448453.
7. Mangels, J. I.,, and B. P. Douglas. 1989. Comparison of four commercial brucella agar media for growth of anaerobic organisms. J. Clin. Microbiol. 27:22682271.
8. Murray, P. R. 1978. Growth of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria on agar media: effects of media composition, storage conditions, and reduction under anaerobic conditions. J. Clin. Microbiol. 8:708714.
9. Thurston, M.,, D. Maida,, and C. Gannon. 2000. Oxyrase cell-membrane preparations simplify cultivation of anaerobic bacteria. Lab. Med. 31:509512.
10. Wiggs, L.,, J. Cavallaro,, and M. Miller. 1998. Evaluation of oxyrase OxyPlate anaerobe incubation system, abstr. C-449. Abstr. 98th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC.

Tables

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Table 4.3-1a

Anaerobic media and their uses

See Appendix 4.3-1 for formulas of commonly used media.

All media for anaerobes should contain vitamin K and hemin.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Culture Media for Anaerobes, p 694-702. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch4.3
Generic image for table
Table 4.3-1b

Anaerobic media and their uses

See Appendix 4.3-1 for formulas of commonly used media.

All media for anaerobes should contain vitamin K and hemin.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Culture Media for Anaerobes, p 694-702. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch4.3
Generic image for table
Table 4.3-2

Recommended primary medium setup

These and all media for isolation of anaerobes should contain vitamin K and hemin.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Culture Media for Anaerobes, p 694-702. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch4.3

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