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Chapter 8.2 : Specimen Selection, Collection, and Transport

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Abstract:

Suitable specimen selection, proper specimen collection, and rapid specimen transport must be performed to ensure the successful isolation of the etiologic agent of a fungal infection. To establish or confirm the diagnosis of a suspected fungal infection, it is essential for the clinician to provide the laboratory with adequate specimens for evaluation. Also, it is essential for the laboratory to have guidelines for the clinician regarding minimum specimen volumes and appropriate specimen transport (e.g., a laboratory manual or web page). The microbiology laboratory should be notified if an unusual pathogen or an organism that can be a significant laboratory hazard is suspected, as some require special handling or special stains. Examples of unusual fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, include spp. (some species require the addition of olive oil to culture media) and spp. (which are more easily detected on a modified acid-fast stain [ section 6 of this handbook]). Examples of potential laboratory hazards include and Additionally, the microbiology laboratory should be contacted prior to certain procedures, as some specimens for fungal culture may require bedside inoculation onto appropriate culture media (e.g., corneal scrapings).

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Specimen Selection, Collection, and Transport, p 386-391. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch8.2
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References

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1. Berenguer, J.,, M. Buck,, F. Witebsky,, F. Stock,, P. Pizzo,, and T. Walsh. 1993. Lysiscentrifugation blood cultures in the detection of tissue-proven invasive candidiasis. Diagn. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 17:103109.
2.International Air Transport Association. 2009. Dangerous Goods Regulations, 50th ed. International Air Transport Association, Miami, FL..
3. Land, G. A.,, and J. Stringfellow,. 1992. Collection and transport of specimens, p. 6.1.16.1.5. In H. D. Isenberg (ed.), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, vol. 1. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC.
4. Lyons, R.,, and G. Woods. 1995. Comparison of the BacT/Alert and ISOLATOR blood culture systems for recovery of fungi. Am. J. Clin. Pathol. 103:660663.
5. Moser, S. 1999. Laboratory diagnosis of his-toplasmosis. Clin. Microbiol. Newsl. 21:9599.
6. Thompson, D. W.,, W. Kaplan,, and B. J. Phillips. 1977. The effect of freezing and the influence of isolation medium on the recovery of pathogenic fungi from sputum. Mycopathologia 61:105.
7. Wey, S.,, and A. Colombo,. 1997. Fungal infections of catheters, p. 139154. In H. Seifert,, B. Jansen,, and B. M. Farr (ed.), Catheter-Related Infections. Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, NY.
8. Wheat, L. J.,, R. B. Kohler,, and R. P. Tewari. 1986. Diagnosis of disseminated histoplasmosis by detection of Histoplasma capsulatum in serum and urine specimens. N. Engl. J. Med. 314:8388.
9. Wilhelmus, K.,, T. J. Liesegang,, M. S. Osato,, and D. B. Jones,. 1994. Cumitech 13A, Laboratory Diagnosis of Ocular Infections. Coordinating ed., S. C. Specter. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, DC.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 8.2–1a

Site-specific selection and collection guidelines

The anatomic site of the fungal infection can be an indicator of what mycotic agent to suspect, but in an immunocompromised patient population, virtually any fungus can be an opportunistic pathogen.

Veterinary specimens should be collected and transported in the same manner as human specimens. SPS, sodium polyanethol sulfonate.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Specimen Selection, Collection, and Transport, p 386-391. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch8.2
Generic image for table
Table 8.2–1b

Site-specific selection and collection guidelines

The anatomic site of the fungal infection can be an indicator of what mycotic agent to suspect, but in an immunocompromised patient population, virtually any fungus can be an opportunistic pathogen.

Veterinary specimens should be collected and transported in the same manner as human specimens. SPS, sodium polyanethol sulfonate.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Specimen Selection, Collection, and Transport, p 386-391. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch8.2

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