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Chapter 8.4 : Processing Specimens for Fungal Culture

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Abstract:

When a specimen is suspected to contain a fungal etiologic agent, it should be processed for fungal culture, regardless of direct microscopic findings. Recovery of fungal pathogens in culture provides definitive diagnosis of mycotic disease, identifies the etiologic agent of infection, and allows evaluation of in vitro susceptibility to antifungal agents. In the event that there is insufficient material for both microscopy and culture, all of the specimen should be used for culture, since this is the more sensitive procedure for detection of fungi. Methods of specimen processing and culture are designed to retain the viability of the fungus and to obtain the maximum yield of organisms from clinical specimens. The choice of media for the isolation of fungi from clinical material is based primarily on the most likely species to be found in a particular site or under a recognized clinical condition. Selective media are included when other microorganisms, particularly bacteria, might also be present in the specimen. Specimens should be processed as soon as possible after receipt. Some specimens may require pretreatment prior to culture.

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Processing Specimens for Fungal Culture, p 409-414. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch8.4
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References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817435.chap8.4
1. Snyder, J. W.,, and R. H. Atlas. 2006. Handbook of Media for Clinical Microbiology, 2nd ed. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL..
2. Evans, E. G. V.,, and M. D. Richardson. 1989. Medical Mycology—a Practical Approach. IRL Press at Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom.
3. LaRocco, M. T., 2007. Reagents, stains, and media: mycology, p. 17371744. In P. R. Murray,, E. J. Baron,, J. H. Jorgensen,, M. L. Landry,, and M. A. Pfaller (ed.), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 9th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
4. Robinson, B. E.,, and A. A. Padhye,. 1988. Collection and transport of clinical specimens, p. 1132. In B. B. Wentworth (ed.), Diagnostic Procedures for Mycotic and Parasitic Diseases, 7th ed. American Public Health Association Inc., Washington, DC.
5. Sutton, D. A., 2007. Specimen collection, transport, and processing: mycology, p. 17281736. In P. R. Murray,, E. J. Baron,, J. H. Jorgensen,, M. L. Landry,, and M. A. Pfaller , (ed.) Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 9th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.

Tables

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Table 8.4–1

Media for the isolation and identification of fungi

With few exceptions, or unless specifically noted, all of the media listed in this table are available from BD Biosciences, Hardy Diagnostics, and Remel. Czapek-Dox and malt extract agar plates and slants are not available from BD Biosciences. Formulations for the nonproprietary media are provided in other procedures within section 8, as well as in the ( ).

Citation: Garcia L. 2010. Processing Specimens for Fungal Culture, p 409-414. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817435.ch8.4

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