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Chapter 2 : Getting Started: Planning the Sampling Mission

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Getting Started: Planning the Sampling Mission, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter is designed to help environmental sampling professionals, regardless of their experience or background, think through the steps necessary to build a logical program. The chapter is not technical; rather, it is written as a practical approach to stimulate a standard thought process. The chapter provides the sampling professional with the basic considerations and guidance to get started with the sampling mission. The sections in the chapter mirror the National Response Team's Technical Assistance Document for Anthrax Response (TAD). Sampling plans are usually developed based on emerging data from previous sampling missions, epidemiological information, or field monitoring. A team of technical experts, with practical experience and the ability to make decisions and recommendations, should be organized to review the remediation process and interpret analytical results. Earlier sections of the chapter stressed the importance of coordinating with many professional disciplines and facility experts who might have specific information or knowledge to support the sampler's needs. In contrast to the team's need to obtain information, a section focuses specifically on the importance of sharing and providing sampling information and results to workers and stakeholders.

Citation: Durno M, Bartos M, Kelly J. 2008. Getting Started: Planning the Sampling Mission, p 25-50. In Emanuel P, Roos J, Niyogi K (ed), Sampling for Biological Agents in the Environment. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817473.ch2
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Figures

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Figure 1

Examples of basic questions.

Citation: Durno M, Bartos M, Kelly J. 2008. Getting Started: Planning the Sampling Mission, p 25-50. In Emanuel P, Roos J, Niyogi K (ed), Sampling for Biological Agents in the Environment. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817473.ch2
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Basic road map for planning an effective sampling mission.

Citation: Durno M, Bartos M, Kelly J. 2008. Getting Started: Planning the Sampling Mission, p 25-50. In Emanuel P, Roos J, Niyogi K (ed), Sampling for Biological Agents in the Environment. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817473.ch2
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Figure 3

Suspicious white powder, situation A.

Citation: Durno M, Bartos M, Kelly J. 2008. Getting Started: Planning the Sampling Mission, p 25-50. In Emanuel P, Roos J, Niyogi K (ed), Sampling for Biological Agents in the Environment. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817473.ch2
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Figure 4

Suspicious white powder, situation B.

Citation: Durno M, Bartos M, Kelly J. 2008. Getting Started: Planning the Sampling Mission, p 25-50. In Emanuel P, Roos J, Niyogi K (ed), Sampling for Biological Agents in the Environment. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817473.ch2
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Figure 5

Sample laboratory results data sheet.

Citation: Durno M, Bartos M, Kelly J. 2008. Getting Started: Planning the Sampling Mission, p 25-50. In Emanuel P, Roos J, Niyogi K (ed), Sampling for Biological Agents in the Environment. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817473.ch2
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Figure A1

A next-generation multipurpose sample collection and tracking device.

Citation: Durno M, Bartos M, Kelly J. 2008. Getting Started: Planning the Sampling Mission, p 25-50. In Emanuel P, Roos J, Niyogi K (ed), Sampling for Biological Agents in the Environment. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817473.ch2
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Figure A2

Surface sampling with the next-generation multipurpose sampling device.

Citation: Durno M, Bartos M, Kelly J. 2008. Getting Started: Planning the Sampling Mission, p 25-50. In Emanuel P, Roos J, Niyogi K (ed), Sampling for Biological Agents in the Environment. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817473.ch2
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Figure A3

Field testing of a next-generation 3-D forensic location-tracking device.

Citation: Durno M, Bartos M, Kelly J. 2008. Getting Started: Planning the Sampling Mission, p 25-50. In Emanuel P, Roos J, Niyogi K (ed), Sampling for Biological Agents in the Environment. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817473.ch2
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References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555817473.chap02
1. Government Accountability Office. 2005. Anthrax Detection: Agencies Need to Validate Sampling Activities in Order to Increase Confidence in Negative Results. GAO-05-251. U.S. Government Accountability Office,Washington, DC.
2. National Response Team. 2002. National Response Team—Technical Assistance Document for Anthrax Response. Interim final draft, September 2002. National Response Team, Washington, DC.
3. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records. Regulation 29CFR1910.1020. U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, DC.
4. Weis, C. P.,, A. J. Intrepido,, A. K. Miller,, P. G. Cowin,, M. A. Durno,, S. Gebhardt,, and R. Bull. 2002. Secondary aerosolization of viable Bacillus anthracis spores in acontaminated US Senate office. JAMA 288:28532858.

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