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Chapter 20 : Conjugative Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance in

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Conjugative Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance in , Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

This chapter talks about the procedure for conjugative transfer of antibiotic resistance in . Public health officials are quite concerned about the rise in antibiotic resistance among disease-causing organisms. For example, is a bacterium that causes stomach cramps, diarrhea, and fever. In 1992, 1.3% of cases of infection studied in Minnesota were caused by bacteria resistant to a fairly new class of antibiotics called quinolones (ciprofloxacin [Cipro] is an example of a quinolone). Virtually every clinically important antibiotic resistance gene is carried on a plasmid. Conjugation allows the spread of plasmids, not only between different individuals of the same bacterial species, but also between species and even between genera. Conjugation has been observed to occur in the soil; on plant surfaces; in lakes, rivers, oceans, sediments, and sewage treatment plants; and inside plants, insects, chickens, mice, and humans. It is believed that conjugation is the most important route of transmission of antibiotic resistance in most disease-causing bacteria. The spread of antibiotic resistance is included at the end of the chapter.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Conjugative Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance in , p 225-233. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Students, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817480_ch20

Key Concept Ranking

Bacterial Cell Wall
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Figures

Image of Figure 20.1
Figure 20.1

Conjugative transfer of ampicillin resistance plasmid.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Conjugative Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance in , p 225-233. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Students, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817480_ch20
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Image of Figure 20.2
Figure 20.2

Diagram for recording results of conjugation experiment.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Conjugative Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance in , p 225-233. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Students, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817480_ch20
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Download as Powerpoint

References

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1. Amabile-Cuevas, C. 2003. New antibiotics, new resistance. American Scientist 91:138.
2. Garrett, L. 1994. The Coming Plague. Penguin Books USA, Inc., New York, NY. This is a long, fascinating book about emerging diseases. Chapter 13 deals with antibiotic resistance.
3. Levy, S. 1998. The challenge of antibiotic resistance. Scientific American 278(3):46.
4. Miller, R. 1998. Bacterial gene swapping in nature. Scientific American 278(1):66.

Tables

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Table 20.1

Expected results

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Conjugative Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance in , p 225-233. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Students, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817480_ch20
Generic image for table
Table 20.2

Examples of mechanisms of action of and mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Conjugative Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance in , p 225-233. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Students, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817480_ch20

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