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Chapter 21 : Transduction of an Antibiotic Resistance Gene

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Transduction of an Antibiotic Resistance Gene, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Transduction is a natural method of gene transfer that occurs in bacteria. The key player in transduction is a bacterial virus, or bacteriophage (phage for short). There are many different bacteriophages that infect many different bacteria. T4 infects by attaching to its outer membrane and injecting its DNA into the bacterial cell. Once inside the cell, the phage DNA takes over. The cell becomes a factory for producing many copies of the T4 genome and for producing large amounts of viral proteins. Some of these proteins help replicate the T4 DNA; others are assembled into new T4 heads and tails. After many copies of the T4 genome have been made and many new heads and tails are floating around in the cytoplasm, still other T4 proteins begin to put together new virus particles. These proteins fill the empty phage heads with T4 DNA and then attach the tails. After many new viruses are assembled, the cell bursts, releasing the virus progeny. The gene for the botulism toxin is not really a gene! Instead, it is carried on a bacteriophage that infects and is thought to have been transduced from another type of bacterium. Other examples of human diseases in which transduction plays a role are food poisoning, diphtheria, and cholera.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Transduction of an Antibiotic Resistance Gene, p 234-237. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Students, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817480_ch21

Key Concept Ranking

Test Tubes
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Clostridium botulinum
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Image of Figure 21.1
Figure 21.1

Transduction of plasmid DNA by bacteriophage T4.

Citation: Kreuzer H, Massey A. 2008. Transduction of an Antibiotic Resistance Gene, p 234-237. In Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: A Guide for Students, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817480_ch21
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