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Chapter 14 : Physicochemical Factors in Growth

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Abstract:

Some physicochemical factors affecting microbial growth are controlled by the constituents of the culture medium (hydrogen ion activity, water activity, osmotic pressure, and viscosity). Others are controlled by the external environment (temperature, oxygen, light, hydrostatic pressure, and magnetic-field strength). This chapter addresses practical aspects of application and control of physicochemical factors. Continuous pH control may be achieved by the automatic addition of acid or base. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the physiology and metabolism of bacteria are discussed. A number of and species also exhibit a microaerophilic phenotype when growing in low-substrate media. The oxidation-reduction (redox) potential (E ) provides a useful scale for measuring the degree of anaerobiosis. Some motile bacteria that possess magnetite- or greigite containing magnetosomes, e.g., (formerly ) , align with the Earth geomagnetic field, which has strength of about 1 G. As a consequence, they show a biased swimming behavior, and both north-seeking and south-seeking forms are known. This behavior has been termed magnetotaxis and is thought, in part, to help these bacteria (many of which are microaerophilic) orient toward aquatic sediments where dissolved-oxygen concentrations are lower than in surface waters.

Citation: Breznak J, Costilow R. 2007. Physicochemical Factors in Growth, p 309-329. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch14
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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Effect of temperature on the generation time of as depicted by an arithmetic plot (top) and by a semi-logarithmic Arrhenius plot (bottom). Data from reference 45.

Citation: Breznak J, Costilow R. 2007. Physicochemical Factors in Growth, p 309-329. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch14
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Gassing cannula used for the Hungate technique. At least two are needed: one for the vessel to be inoculated or filled with medium, and one for the vessel containing the inoculum or the medium to be dispensed. After assembly, autoclave the cotton-filled glass syringe and needle, dry in a drying oven at 100°C, allow to cool, and connect to butyl rubber tubing. Thereafter, flame the needle to sterilize it before inserting it into a vessel. This procedure also permits a constant check that gas is flowing through the needle, since the issuing gas should make a visible dent in the flame. Tubes or flasks must be constantly gassed when open.

Citation: Breznak J, Costilow R. 2007. Physicochemical Factors in Growth, p 309-329. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch14
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Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

pH indicators and their useful pH range

Prepare 0.04% solutions by solubilizing 0.1 g in the smallest possible volume (10 to 30 ml) of 0.01 N NaOH, and then dilute to 250 ml.

Citation: Breznak J, Costilow R. 2007. Physicochemical Factors in Growth, p 309-329. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch14
Generic image for table
TABLE 2

pKvalues of chemical compounds used in buffers

Citation: Breznak J, Costilow R. 2007. Physicochemical Factors in Growth, p 309-329. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch14
Generic image for table
TABLE 3

Formulas for buffers frequently used in microbiological media

Data adapted from reference .

Formula: ml of 0.2 M acetic acid + (50 - ) ml of 0.2 M sodium acetate, diluted to 100 ml.

Formula: ml of 0.1 M citric acid + (50 - ) ml of 0.2 M NaHPO, diluted to 100 ml.

Formula: ml of 0.2 M NaHPO + (50 - ) ml of 0.2 M NaHPO, diluted to 100 ml.

Formula: 50 ml of 0.2 M Tris + ml of 0.2 M HCl, diluted to 100 ml.

Citation: Breznak J, Costilow R. 2007. Physicochemical Factors in Growth, p 309-329. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch14
Generic image for table
TABLE 4

Values of α (COsolubility) and p at various temperatures

Milliliters of CO (reduced to 0°C and 760 mm Hg) that will dissolve in 1 ml of pure water at a gas pressure of 1 atm (760 mm Hg) at the stated temperature. The values for α in column A do not consider the contribution of water vapor pressure to the total gas pressure ( ). The values in column B have been recalculated from values in references and and do consider the contribution of water vapor pressure to the total gas pressure.

Citation: Breznak J, Costilow R. 2007. Physicochemical Factors in Growth, p 309-329. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch14
Generic image for table
TABLE 5

Ostwald coefficients for various gases

Values are in milliliters per milliliter of HO at a partial pressure of 1 atm of the pure gas and at the specified temperature.

Citation: Breznak J, Costilow R. 2007. Physicochemical Factors in Growth, p 309-329. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch14
Generic image for table
TABLE 6

Standard redox potentials of various dyes at pH 7.0 and 30°C

Data from reference , where a more complete list is to be found.

Formed from resazurin by reduction.

Citation: Breznak J, Costilow R. 2007. Physicochemical Factors in Growth, p 309-329. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch14
Generic image for table
TABLE 7

Chemical reducing agents for anoxic media

Stock solutions may be autoclaved and stored under O-free gas.

At pH 7, about one-half the added sulfide exists as gaseous HS and one-half exists as HS.

Insoluble PdCl powder is included in the medium at ca. 330 µg/ml and acts as a catalyst for reduction of the medium by H, which can be included in the gas phase. For H-consuming bacteria such as methanogens, which are usually grown under a gas phase of H/CO (80/20, vol/vol), the H thereby acts both as a substrate and as a medium-reducing agent.

Prepared from commercial 20% solutions of TiCl as described in reference . Purchase TiC1 in small volumes under N, and prepare stock solutions of the citrate salt as needed.

Citation: Breznak J, Costilow R. 2007. Physicochemical Factors in Growth, p 309-329. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch14
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TABLE 8

Absorption coefficients (α) for water at 20°C

Data from reference .

Citation: Breznak J, Costilow R. 2007. Physicochemical Factors in Growth, p 309-329. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch14

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