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Chapter 46 : Laboratory Safety

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Laboratory Safety, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Laboratory safety requires an awareness of the possible risks associated with the handling of hazardous materials, knowledge of mechanisms by which exposures may occur, use of safeguards and techniques that reduce the potential for exposures, and vigilance against compromise and error. Laboratory safety is the subject of several federal health and safety regulations and guidelines. The assessment of potential risks used to define classes of experiments assigned to each containment level, and the selection of safe laboratory practices, containment equipment, and facility safeguards that describe the safety requirements for each level were based on the scientific knowledge and experience acquired in bacteriological and microbiological laboratories conducting research and diagnostic studies involving human pathogens. The majority of cases in which the source of infection is identified could have been prevented by regular use of good laboratory safety practices. Several routine operations in the laboratory can easily become the source of laboratory-acquired infections. They require vigilance to guard against compromise and error. This chapter emphasizes the hazards associated with these operations and underscores the precautions necessary to conduct them safely. Chemical disinfection is necessary because the use of pressurized steam, the most reliable method of sterilization, and other physical methods are not normally feasible for disinfection of large spaces, surfaces, and stationary equipment.

Citation: Barkley W, Mickelson C. 2007. Laboratory Safety, p 997-1018. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch46

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Figures

Image of FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1

Biohazard warning sign for biomedical facilities.

Citation: Barkley W, Mickelson C. 2007. Laboratory Safety, p 997-1018. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch46
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Image of FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2

Class I biological safety cabinet.

Citation: Barkley W, Mickelson C. 2007. Laboratory Safety, p 997-1018. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch46
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Image of FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3

Class II biological safety cabinet.

Citation: Barkley W, Mickelson C. 2007. Laboratory Safety, p 997-1018. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch46
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Image of FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4

Exponential death plot, showing the graphic determination of a -value and a survivor probability.

Citation: Barkley W, Mickelson C. 2007. Laboratory Safety, p 997-1018. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch46
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

Some considerations in the selection and use of chemical disinfectants in biomedical laboratories

Citation: Barkley W, Mickelson C. 2007. Laboratory Safety, p 997-1018. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch46
Generic image for table
TABLE 2

Influence of incomplete air discharge on autoclave temperatures

Data from reference .

Citation: Barkley W, Mickelson C. 2007. Laboratory Safety, p 997-1018. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch46
Generic image for table
TABLE 3

Effect of liquid volume and number of containers on time required for liquid to reach 121°C in an autoclave

Data from reference .

Citation: Barkley W, Mickelson C. 2007. Laboratory Safety, p 997-1018. In Reddy C, Beveridge T, Breznak J, Marzluf G, Schmidt T, Snyder L (ed), Methods for General and Molecular Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555817497.ch46

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